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German scientists find fresh evidence of canine intelligence | Dogs | The Guardian

From a canny look to a quizzical grumble, dogs have long conveyed the impression they know more about what their owners are up to than what might be expected. Now researchers have found fresh evidence of canine savviness, revealing dogs seem to be able to tell whether human actions are deliberate or accidental.
#psychology #intelligence #TheoryOfMind #animals #dogs
 

German scientists find fresh evidence of canine intelligence | Dogs | The Guardian

From a canny look to a quizzical grumble, dogs have long conveyed the impression they know more about what their owners are up to than what might be expected. Now researchers have found fresh evidence of canine savviness, revealing dogs seem to be able to tell whether human actions are deliberate or accidental.
#psychology #intelligence #TheoryOfMind #animals #dogs
 
Damage to part of the brainstem results in people having no REM sleep but still having dreams. Thus proving that dreams and REM sleep are not the same thing. Since REM sleep was discovered in the 1950s and found to correlate with dreams, dreams and REM sleep have been thought to be the same thing, but they are not. Experiments with cats (probably chosen because they sleep a lot) showed that separating the brain stem from the forebrain stops REM sleep, but you can't ask a cat whether it is dreaming. But in humans, some humans have naturally occurring brain lesions and you can ask them what they are experiencing. And damage to a certain part of the brainstem results in loss of REM sleep but they still have dreams.

Damage to the posterior cortex has the opposite effect: those people have lots of REM sleep but no dreams. Loss of white matter fibers under the ventromedial prefrontal cortex also causes loss of dreams. And in that area, as it turns out, people in the 1930s and 40s once did surgeries in that area to stop hallucinations. It did stop hallucinations but also stopped dreams, and people also lost spontaneity and it affected their motivation.

That led this researcher to zero in on something called the meso-cortical-meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit, which is part of that bundle of white matter fibers that connect various parts of the brain to various other parts of the brain. PET scans show the meso-cortical-meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit is the most active part of the brain during dreams. Increasing dopamine in this pathway with a dopamine booster drug massively increases dreams but not REM sleep. On the flip side, Blocking dopamine with antipsychotics decreases dreams but does not affect REM sleep.

Back in the cat surgery days, people had a theory that acetylcholine produced in the brainstem would go into the rest of the brain and produce dreams, but they had no way to test this, but we live in the age of drugs that can block acetylcholine. What happens if you block acetylcholine is you get more dreams, not less, in fact dreams while you're awake if you're not careful.

Sigmund Freud had a theory that dreams were all about secret wish fulfillment. The executive part of the brain would shut off and the secret wishes would express themselves, but in a way that someone other than the dreamer might not recognize because the dreams seem so random. But by doing a "free association" exercise, the associations with the symbols in the dreams would be revealed, and the "latent" meaning of the dream revealed.

Well, in fact, PET scans show the prefrontal cortex, the "executive planning" part of the brain, is in fact shut off during dreaming, and patients who have lesions in the prefrontal cortex, and who have great difficulty planning in real life, have no problem dreaming. Not only that, but the meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit is very strongly tied to emotion and motivation. So Freud's "wish fulfillment" theory seems on the mark, more or less, but he didn't know about REM sleep or anything -- he guessed it just from talking to people.

What happens to the sleep of people who can't dream? They can't stay asleep. They go from deep sleep to being awake. They usually wake up as soon as REM sleep starts. One person slept only a few minutes over the course of an entire night. The worst sleep the researcher has ever seen.

Non-dreamers have much less efficient sleep. Dreamers (who were patients who had lesions in other parts of the brain but could dream) woke up 3.5 times/hour, while non-dreamers woke up 12.5 times/hour.



#discoveries #neuroscience #psychology #rem #dreams
 
Damage to part of the brainstem results in people having no REM sleep but still having dreams. Thus proving that dreams and REM sleep are not the same thing. Since REM sleep was discovered in the 1950s and found to correlate with dreams, dreams and REM sleep have been thought to be the same thing, but they are not. Experiments with cats (probably chosen because they sleep a lot) showed that separating the brain stem from the forebrain stops REM sleep, but you can't ask a cat whether it is dreaming. But in humans, some humans have naturally occurring brain lesions and you can ask them what they are experiencing. And damage to a certain part of the brainstem results in loss of REM sleep but they still have dreams.

Damage to the posterior cortex has the opposite effect: those people have lots of REM sleep but no dreams. Loss of white matter fibers under the ventromedial prefrontal cortex also causes loss of dreams. And in that area, as it turns out, people in the 1930s and 40s once did surgeries in that area to stop hallucinations. It did stop hallucinations but also stopped dreams, and people also lost spontaneity and it affected their motivation.

That led this researcher to zero in on something called the meso-cortical-meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit, which is part of that bundle of white matter fibers that connect various parts of the brain to various other parts of the brain. PET scans show the meso-cortical-meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit is the most active part of the brain during dreams. Increasing dopamine in this pathway with a dopamine booster drug massively increases dreams but not REM sleep. On the flip side, Blocking dopamine with antipsychotics decreases dreams but does not affect REM sleep.

Back in the cat surgery days, people had a theory that acetylcholine produced in the brainstem would go into the rest of the brain and produce dreams, but they had no way to test this, but we live in the age of drugs that can block acetylcholine. What happens if you block acetylcholine is you get more dreams, not less, in fact dreams while you're awake if you're not careful.

Sigmund Freud had a theory that dreams were all about secret wish fulfillment. The executive part of the brain would shut off and the secret wishes would express themselves, but in a way that someone other than the dreamer might not recognize because the dreams seem so random. But by doing a "free association" exercise, the associations with the symbols in the dreams would be revealed, and the "latent" meaning of the dream revealed.

Well, in fact, PET scans show the prefrontal cortex, the "executive planning" part of the brain, is in fact shut off during dreaming, and patients who have lesions in the prefrontal cortex, and who have great difficulty planning in real life, have no problem dreaming. Not only that, but the meso-limbic-dopamine-circuit is very strongly tied to emotion and motivation. So Freud's "wish fulfillment" theory seems on the mark, more or less, but he didn't know about REM sleep or anything -- he guessed it just from talking to people.

What happens to the sleep of people who can't dream? They can't stay asleep. They go from deep sleep to being awake. They usually wake up as soon as REM sleep starts. One person slept only a few minutes over the course of an entire night. The worst sleep the researcher has ever seen.

Non-dreamers have much less efficient sleep. Dreamers (who were patients who had lesions in other parts of the brain but could dream) woke up 3.5 times/hour, while non-dreamers woke up 12.5 times/hour.



#discoveries #neuroscience #psychology #rem #dreams
 

Constant craving: how digital media turned us all into dopamine addicts | Life and style | The Guardian

According to addiction expert Dr Anna Lembke, our smartphones are making us dopamine junkies, with each swipe, like and tweet feeding our habit. So how do we beat our digital dependency?
For some years now, a number of people working in mental health care have noticed what some have described as a "pervasive, low-grade mental disorder" characterised by increased signs of depression, antisocial behaviour, and passive-aggressive reactions to normal situations. And some have questioned whether there is a link between this and the increased use of smartphones. The term "internet addiction disorder" was used for some time, though perhaps better replaced with "smartphone addiction disorder". The underlying biology of dopamine addiction is possibly sufficient to explain all of this, but can the answer be to simply put the phone in a drawer?

#technology #tech #psychology #psychiatry #MentalHealth #dopamine #addiction
 

Constant craving: how digital media turned us all into dopamine addicts | Life and style | The Guardian

According to addiction expert Dr Anna Lembke, our smartphones are making us dopamine junkies, with each swipe, like and tweet feeding our habit. So how do we beat our digital dependency?
For some years now, a number of people working in mental health care have noticed what some have described as a "pervasive, low-grade mental disorder" characterised by increased signs of depression, antisocial behaviour, and passive-aggressive reactions to normal situations. And some have questioned whether there is a link between this and the increased use of smartphones. The term "internet addiction disorder" was used for some time, though perhaps better replaced with "smartphone addiction disorder". The underlying biology of dopamine addiction is possibly sufficient to explain all of this, but can the answer be to simply put the phone in a drawer?

#technology #tech #psychology #psychiatry #MentalHealth #dopamine #addiction
 

Intimacy Does Not Scale


So, on another social network, a familiar pattern emerged earlier today:
  • Person A discussing a matter of personal relevance, with a specific interpretation.
  • Person B, not an immediate party to the conversation, but linked through other participant C, voices an apparently reasonable alternate viewpoint.
  • Person A attacks B, largely for challenging A's narrative.
  • Person B counterattacks A, calling out the hostility.
  • Several others join.
(Please trust me that the details and specific conversation do not matter. The pattern is an archetype.)

In the ensuing conversation, a friend, online discussion facilitator, my own instance's admin, and a long-time friend from Google+ days, suggests a technical solution: context tags, applied by post authors.

TL;DR: I don't think technical fixes will work here.
  • My first inclination on seeing several later posts in the thread was to note that some people operate in "conflict reduction" mode, others in "conflict amplification" mode. And that this might be a case of the latter.
  • Turns out original posster (OP) on thre thread was in fact operating in "conflict amplification" mode: failing to take a charitable interpretation of an interaction.
  • With four decades of online experience ... I've come to the conclusion that explicitly-invoked technological fixes won't do much here. I'd long thought otherwise.
Additionally:
  • There's a technology that's emerged in the past decade supplying many of these capabilities, emojis. Though they have their own limits and pitfals.
  • There are in fact words which can express all of these things.
In intimate conversation ---a case where both or all parties in the same space and time --- there are additional ample side-channels for subtexts to be communicated, including both conflict-diminishing and conflict-escallating ones. And miscommunications and disproportionate responses still occur all the time. Who has never had a fight or misunderstanding with a partner?

It's far harder in mediated discussion. We're operating with much less bandwidth, poorly-developed conventions, and widely divergent expectations and practices. Media is intermediate agency. Media gives scale, but scale gives conflict.

On the Fediverse, any discussion extends beyond the immediate participants. This includes DMs (instance admins can view posts). "Unlisted" toots skip the main timelines, but are accessible to anyone with Web connection, and even "Followers-only" discussions can join across multiple accounts' follower lists (though often in fragemented form). Numerous other social platforms and protocols have symilar dynamics.

We're having a public conversation in a very large room with really strange acoustics. Whispers carry 'round the world (and beyond), and resonate for years. And yes, this means others can listen, and engage. There are many people who seem to believe this is not the case. Unfortunately, that's a belief strongly at odds with reality. Such misalignments often result in disappointment.

(Though yes, if I want to ensure I am only talking with the intended reciipients to the limits of the system, I'll employ DMs. There are of course stronger levels of assurance possible.)

My response to people who respond with hostility is generally to mute or block them. If constructive engagement isn't possible, then don't try to force it ("Block Fuckwits": https://toot.cat/@dredmorbius/104371585950783019)

Which of course means that this theoretically rich social web we have develops some interesting holes and disconnections. (I've been thinking that the emergent structre created by personal and instance-level blocking and muting may be one of the more interesting bits of social networks, creating a resilient structure in an otherwise often structureless space.)

Solution-shaped Objects


I'm not sure what solutions might exist, though some thoughts:
  • Practicing de-escallation smooths over a tremendous amount of frictions.
  • Some people see that itself as perpetuating offence or shifting load (social, emotional), possibly to those least able to address it.
  • B responded in a self-defence mode. Note that this was largely a matching of the empathy level shown and demonstrated. I'm increasingly given to doing this myself, though usually not immediatel in an exchange.
  • A quick "hat check" on a profile in question also frequently answers questions about temperment. For obvious trolls and griefers I'll simply block/ignore immediately. The supply is endless, pick your battles. A subsequent subtoot might be warranted for others, but irrationality by definition cannot be reasoned with.
  • Sometimes encounters born in conflict are fruitful, and I've had a few of those. Less so in recent years, though I'll have to admit.
  • Be mindful of how your own comments might be interpreted or read, in context. If someone expresses tediousness or unwillingness to continue a discussion, take the hint. (A major trigger of my own block is in fact others insisting on continuing a discussion I've no interest in.)
  • If you suspect someone of a tendentious or beligerent viewpoint, rather than attacking on first encounter, requesting clarification may be useful. From me, a "???" indicates "I'm sorry, I don't quite understand, could you please explain in more detail or clarify?" The reasonable will do so. The unreasonable will quite frequently reveal themselves fully at this point.
Socialisation ... may help. That is, training people in the characteristics of the system, public nature of most discussion, and the principles of de-escallation. That only scales so far though. Early Usenet had ~100k active participants and a potential reach of ~1m people (Brian Reed, 1988, via J. Quarterman's The Matrix, 1990). Several subsequent online communities seemed to hit inflection points of increasingly toxic behaviour at ~100k -- 1m users. Arguably a huge function of present 1 billion+ social media networks is hygiene functions.

Instance admins may be able to assist. The instance admin in question here has decades of experience, and far more patience than I, here.

Mostly, though, the message seems to be that Dave Winer was right: conversation doesn't scale very well.

Intimay is Technologically Resistant


I'd used the term "intimate" earlier, and as I consider various forms and modes of media, I'm more strongly convinced that that is the proper contrast with "mediated" interactions.

Intimacy is close, near, full-contact, and small. Intimacy does not scale. Intimacy is the opposite of scale.

All our intermediations put something between individuals: time, space, equipment, records, codes, algorithms, or simply scale itself. One of the longest promises of technology is that it can scale intimacy. I'm inclined to believe that this is a fundamental contradiction, and hence impossible.

#intimacy #scale #media #intermediation #conflict #conflictResolution #Deescallation #publicBehaviour #behaviour #psychology #sociology #SocialMedia #TheFediverse
 

Intimacy Does Not Scale


So, on another social network, a familiar pattern emerged earlier today:
  • Person A discussing a matter of personal relevance, with a specific interpretation.
  • Person B, not an immediate party to the conversation, but linked through other participant C, voices an apparently reasonable alternate viewpoint.
  • Person A attacks B, largely for challenging A's narrative.
  • Person B counterattacks A, calling out the hostility.
  • Several others join.
(Please trust me that the details and specific conversation do not matter. The pattern is an archetype.)

In the ensuing conversation, a friend, online discussion facilitator, my own instance's admin, and a long-time friend from Google+ days, suggests a technical solution: context tags, applied by post authors.

TL;DR: I don't think technical fixes will work here.
  • My first inclination on seeing several later posts in the thread was to note that some people operate in "conflict reduction" mode, others in "conflict amplification" mode. And that this might be a case of the latter.
  • Turns out original posster (OP) on thre thread was in fact operating in "conflict amplification" mode: failing to take a charitable interpretation of an interaction.
  • With four decades of online experience ... I've come to the conclusion that explicitly-invoked technological fixes won't do much here. I'd long thought otherwise.
Additionally:
  • There's a technology that's emerged in the past decade supplying many of these capabilities, emojis. Though they have their own limits and pitfals.
  • There are in fact words which can express all of these things.
In intimate conversation ---a case where both or all parties in the same space and time --- there are additional ample side-channels for subtexts to be communicated, including both conflict-diminishing and conflict-escallating ones. And miscommunications and disproportionate responses still occur all the time. Who has never had a fight or misunderstanding with a partner?

It's far harder in mediated discussion. We're operating with much less bandwidth, poorly-developed conventions, and widely divergent expectations and practices. Media is intermediate agency. Media gives scale, but scale gives conflict.

On the Fediverse, any discussion extends beyond the immediate participants. This includes DMs (instance admins can view posts). "Unlisted" toots skip the main timelines, but are accessible to anyone with Web connection, and even "Followers-only" discussions can join across multiple accounts' follower lists (though often in fragemented form). Numerous other social platforms and protocols have symilar dynamics.

We're having a public conversation in a very large room with really strange acoustics. Whispers carry 'round the world (and beyond), and resonate for years. And yes, this means others can listen, and engage. There are many people who seem to believe this is not the case. Unfortunately, that's a belief strongly at odds with reality. Such misalignments often result in disappointment.

(Though yes, if I want to ensure I am only talking with the intended reciipients to the limits of the system, I'll employ DMs. There are of course stronger levels of assurance possible.)

My response to people who respond with hostility is generally to mute or block them. If constructive engagement isn't possible, then don't try to force it ("Block Fuckwits": https://toot.cat/@dredmorbius/104371585950783019)

Which of course means that this theoretically rich social web we have develops some interesting holes and disconnections. (I've been thinking that the emergent structre created by personal and instance-level blocking and muting may be one of the more interesting bits of social networks, creating a resilient structure in an otherwise often structureless space.)

Solution-shaped Objects


I'm not sure what solutions might exist, though some thoughts:
  • Practicing de-escallation smooths over a tremendous amount of frictions.
  • Some people see that itself as perpetuating offence or shifting load (social, emotional), possibly to those least able to address it.
  • B responded in a self-defence mode. Note that this was largely a matching of the empathy level shown and demonstrated. I'm increasingly given to doing this myself, though usually not immediatel in an exchange.
  • A quick "hat check" on a profile in question also frequently answers questions about temperment. For obvious trolls and griefers I'll simply block/ignore immediately. The supply is endless, pick your battles. A subsequent subtoot might be warranted for others, but irrationality by definition cannot be reasoned with.
  • Sometimes encounters born in conflict are fruitful, and I've had a few of those. Less so in recent years, though I'll have to admit.
  • Be mindful of how your own comments might be interpreted or read, in context. If someone expresses tediousness or unwillingness to continue a discussion, take the hint. (A major trigger of my own block is in fact others insisting on continuing a discussion I've no interest in.)
  • If you suspect someone of a tendentious or beligerent viewpoint, rather than attacking on first encounter, requesting clarification may be useful. From me, a "???" indicates "I'm sorry, I don't quite understand, could you please explain in more detail or clarify?" The reasonable will do so. The unreasonable will quite frequently reveal themselves fully at this point.
Socialisation ... may help. That is, training people in the characteristics of the system, public nature of most discussion, and the principles of de-escallation. That only scales so far though. Early Usenet had ~100k active participants and a potential reach of ~1m people (Brian Reed, 1988, via J. Quarterman's The Matrix, 1990). Several subsequent online communities seemed to hit inflection points of increasingly toxic behaviour at ~100k -- 1m users. Arguably a huge function of present 1 billion+ social media networks is hygiene functions.

Instance admins may be able to assist. The instance admin in question here has decades of experience, and far more patience than I, here.

Mostly, though, the message seems to be that Dave Winer was right: conversation doesn't scale very well.

Intimay is Technologically Resistant


I'd used the term "intimate" earlier, and as I consider various forms and modes of media, I'm more strongly convinced that that is the proper contrast with "mediated" interactions.

Intimacy is close, near, full-contact, and small. Intimacy does not scale. Intimacy is the opposite of scale.

All our intermediations put something between individuals: time, space, equipment, records, codes, algorithms, or simply scale itself. One of the longest promises of technology is that it can scale intimacy. I'm inclined to believe that this is a fundamental contradiction, and hence impossible.

#intimacy #scale #media #intermediation #conflict #conflictResolution #Deescallation #publicBehaviour #behaviour #psychology #sociology #SocialMedia #TheFediverse
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #books, #psychology and #cooking
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. [Well, on this pod!]
I’m interested in #communication, #internet, #photography, and #psychology.

OK, Hi, I'm "here", in the motherland of diaspora*, though not a newbie.
Arrived in the Fediverse after 8 years of wonderful life and immersion in Google+.
Now threatened again with extinction in the pod meant to sustain the survivors, about to experience another upheaval. :(

Posted many music/photo collages over the past few years, a few public, most to aspects.
My photos may be found (or will be) with the hashtag #fenfotos . I'm on Flickr & Twitter too, thankfully undisturbed for decades.

Lots of good things said about "here". I'm far from home now but will try to populate some of my favorite posts onto this pod when/if I can, and post primarily to this spot as time wears on. Hoping those who are already connected will re-aspect me & I'll do same.

Thanks for the welcomes and anticipated suggestions (sharing by tags, aspects, etc.)
Really hoping to have a reliable home... because...There's no place like home
Thanks for the encouragement to move to this neighborhood, hope my music isn't too loud. :))

YouTube: There's No Place Like Home (manyhappyrepeats)

 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. [Well, on this pod!]
I’m interested in #communication, #internet, #photography, and #psychology.

OK, Hi, I'm "here", in the motherland of diaspora*, though not a newbie.
Arrived in the Fediverse after 8 years of wonderful life and immersion in Google+.
Now threatened again with extinction in the pod meant to sustain the survivors, about to experience another upheaval. :(

Posted many music/photo collages over the past few years, a few public, most to aspects.
My photos may be found (or will be) with the hashtag #fenfotos . I'm on Flickr & Twitter too, thankfully undisturbed for decades.

Lots of good things said about "here". I'm far from home now but will try to populate some of my favorite posts onto this pod when/if I can, and post primarily to this spot as time wears on. Hoping those who are already connected will re-aspect me & I'll do same.

Thanks for the welcomes and anticipated suggestions (sharing by tags, aspects, etc.)
Really hoping to have a reliable home... because...There's no place like home
Thanks for the encouragement to move to this neighborhood, hope my music isn't too loud. :))

YouTube: There's No Place Like Home (manyhappyrepeats)

 
FYI https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnsyn.2021.635879/full

#science #learning #psychology
 
"From somewhere beyond his perception, a voice asked: 'Do you speak Spanish?' He hesitated. He had expected the questions to come -- but he did not know how to answer this one."

"Eventually, he responded to the voice: 'No.' He had a good grasp of Spanish, but he wasn't fluent. The voice asked some more questions, and the young man answered, yes or no."

"And then he woke up."

"This 20-year-old biology student, identified only as 'AC,' was one of 36 participants in a proof-of-concept study investigating whether it is possible to have a real-time, two-way conversation between a researcher and an asleep dreamer. And along with five other participants, AC's experience reveals the answer appears to be yes."

"AC is in some ways a special case -- he has narcolepsy, a sleep disorder which causes people to fall asleep both often and spontaneously throughout their day."

Why do people have lucid dreams? Study questions the limits of consciousness

#psychology #sleep #luciddreaming
 
"From somewhere beyond his perception, a voice asked: 'Do you speak Spanish?' He hesitated. He had expected the questions to come -- but he did not know how to answer this one."

"Eventually, he responded to the voice: 'No.' He had a good grasp of Spanish, but he wasn't fluent. The voice asked some more questions, and the young man answered, yes or no."

"And then he woke up."

"This 20-year-old biology student, identified only as 'AC,' was one of 36 participants in a proof-of-concept study investigating whether it is possible to have a real-time, two-way conversation between a researcher and an asleep dreamer. And along with five other participants, AC's experience reveals the answer appears to be yes."

"AC is in some ways a special case -- he has narcolepsy, a sleep disorder which causes people to fall asleep both often and spontaneously throughout their day."

Why do people have lucid dreams? Study questions the limits of consciousness

#psychology #sleep #luciddreaming
 
Just as a note, and/or point of information, Maslow is best known for that pyramid and hierarchy, the "top level" being "self-actualization".

Maslow's Hierarchy

Bild/Foto

One might argue that "morality" is not even mentioned - or necessarily required. Some of what "self-actualization" entails, like the rest of the needs and aspirations in the pyramid, is subjective, or aspirational.

OTOH, if you want to focus on moral development, I'd submit that (within psychology) one should turn to Kohlberg. Although he doesn't usually appear in pyramid form, I found one! Note the development - and you might place a favorite leader somewhere here for fun - is all about moral stages. Also there is overlap, you may see with Maslow. (both "humanists" but different perspective & focus)

Kohlberg's Six Stages of Moral Development




=> Article: Kohlberg's 6 Stages of Moral Development

Lastly, again, from a psychology/philosophy P.O.V. sorry (that's what I know!) -
IMM also very worthy of mention is Erik Erikson, who probably overlaps with Maslow, Rogers, Kohlberg and others. Like H.S. Sullivan ("father of interpersonal psychiatry"), he posits that there are choices, forks in the road, and that sometimes a good move now can mitigate the harm done in previous times. And vice versa.

For Erikson each of the "pyramid" steps comes in a pair of choices, and either you attain the higher-level choice or not. For him the ultimate ending point in life, is a choice between "integrity and despair". That is ... deep.
Maslow does the basic life choices, Kohlberg does morality, and Erikson offers another flavor, with his 8 Stages of PsychoSocial Development

Apologies for pulling Maslow away from jobs and into the realm of #psychology. :))
 

The #Dunning-Kruger Effect Is Probably Not Real | Office for Science and Society - https://bit.ly/3hrn9c3


#science #psychology
 

The #Dunning-Kruger Effect Is Probably Not Real | Office for Science and Society - https://bit.ly/3hrn9c3


#science #psychology
 
Study: children’s belief in Santa Claus is more nuanced than you think | Ars Technica
Santa falls into an ambiguous category between "real" and "nonreal" for many children
#science #psychology
 
#Salon #Psychology #PTSD #Abuse #Society #Trump
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #communication, #cyberpsychology, #photography, and #psychology. Thanks for the invite, @Tursiops!

Thanks, @Tursiops, for the invite and your active role in keeping things smooth.
I've been "Federated" since just before the demise of #googleplus /#gplus
So I guess I might tag #gplusrefugee . But I've settled into pora* via pluspora, and have many acquaintances now across pods/instancies/geography.

So this is my effort to stay both on and off the grid, should my existing pora* instance go down, as it sometimes does. I hope to "cross-connect" with others already in my aspects, and have another way to stay connected across the Fediverse. (I'm on Flickr for photography as well.)

Enough. Hi. Happy to be "here". #StaySafe (my preoccupation, here in NYC, since around March)
☮︎
 
"We found that people in Catalonia scored considerably higher on mental well-being than people in all three northern European countries – challenging the prevailing idea that places in northern Europe are typically happier than those in southern Europe."

#science #psychology #til

Scandinavia may not be the happiest place on Earth after all
https://theconversation.com/amp/scandinavia-may-not-be-the-happiest-place-on-earth-after-all-110382
 
**True, sadly. Probably more or less catastrophic depending on context - situation, supports, “resiliency”, etc.
But we’ve seen this coming for months, in major U.S. cities, definitely.
Stay safe. Listen to science & health experts. Hang in there… sanity and vaccines are on the horizon.***

*One or both
Newsweek: Students May Not Survive COVID Lockdown Without Urgent Mental Health Support

#copingwithCovid #coronavirus #college #COVID19 #stress #education #StaySafe #MentalHealth #psychology
 
**True, sadly. Probably more or less catastrophic depending on context - situation, supports, “resiliency”, etc.
But we’ve seen this coming for months, in major U.S. cities, definitely.
Stay safe. Listen to science & health experts. Hang in there… sanity and vaccines are on the horizon.***

*One or both
Newsweek: Students May Not Survive COVID Lockdown Without Urgent Mental Health Support

#copingwithCovid #coronavirus #college #COVID19 #stress #education #StaySafe #MentalHealth #psychology
 
**True, sadly. Probably more or less catastrophic depending on context - situation, supports, “resiliency”, etc.
But we’ve seen this coming for months, in major U.S. cities, definitely.
Stay safe. Listen to science & health experts. Hang in there… sanity and vaccines are on the horizon.***

*One or both
Newsweek: Students May Not Survive COVID Lockdown Without Urgent Mental Health Support

#copingwithCovid #coronavirus #college #COVID19 #stress #education #StaySafe #MentalHealth #psychology
 
You surely know all intelligence tests.
Do any of you know "consciousness tests" ?
I don't mean to test if someone is conscious, but in how far he is conscious of himself and/or others.
Even if there are certainly overlapping opinions, I do not mean esoteric, religious or spiritual perceptions, but more objective, comparable test models.

Ihr kennt ja sicherlich alle Intelligenz Tests.
Kennt jemand von euch "Bewusstseins Tests" ?
Ich meine damit nicht, zu testen ob jemand bei Bewusstsein, sondern in wie fern er sich seiner selbst und oder anderer Bewusst ist.
Auch wenn es da sicherlich überschneidende Meinungen gibt, ich meine damit nicht esoterische, religiöse oder spirituelle Wahrnehmungen, sondern objektivere, vergleichbare Testmodelle.

Any Keywords, catchwords, references to literature or links would be great. Thank you in advance.
Schlüsselwörter, Schlagwörter, Literaturhinweise oder Links wären großartig. Vielen Dank im Voraus.

#neurologie #neurology #psychologie #psychology #question #Frage #science #wissenschaft
 
⬡ Using federated instances as discussion communities
Prof. Dr. José Manuel Meza Cano

Live Q&A Recording https://conf.tube/videos/watch/cdbccd5f-f7d3-4d1f-a778-e45f9c876f66
Debate in Forum https://socialhub.activitypub.rocks/t/using-federated-instances-as-discussion-communities/944
Watch the English Talk https://conf.tube/videos/watch/2b43c03e-b5d7-420d-b30d-fe16fda7f498
Spanish: https://conf.tube/videos/watch/e2923ad5-afc5-49e7-afa3-613eef44adb6

From the field of #psychology, specifically cultural psychology, emphasis is placed on the construction of #discussion spaces that have traditionally been seen as the physical #classroom, …

#fediverse #mastodon #federation #activitypub #apconf2020
 

The spread of true and false news online | Science

Lies spread faster than the truth


There is worldwide concern over false news and the possibility that it can influence political, economic, and social well-being. To understand how false news spreads, Vosoughi et al. used a data set of rumor cascades on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. About 126,000 rumors were spread by ∼3 million people. False news reached more people than the truth; the top 1% of false news cascades diffused to between 1000 and 100,000 people, whereas the truth rarely diffused to more than 1000 people. Falsehood also diffused faster than the truth. The degree of novelty and the emotional reactions of recipients may be responsible for the differences observed.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6380/1146

#internet #tech #technology #SocialMedia #online #news #FakeNews #Twitter #media #politics #health #ConspiracyTheories #psychology
 

The spread of true and false news online | Science

Lies spread faster than the truth


There is worldwide concern over false news and the possibility that it can influence political, economic, and social well-being. To understand how false news spreads, Vosoughi et al. used a data set of rumor cascades on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. About 126,000 rumors were spread by ∼3 million people. False news reached more people than the truth; the top 1% of false news cascades diffused to between 1000 and 100,000 people, whereas the truth rarely diffused to more than 1000 people. Falsehood also diffused faster than the truth. The degree of novelty and the emotional reactions of recipients may be responsible for the differences observed.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6380/1146

#internet #tech #technology #SocialMedia #online #news #FakeNews #Twitter #media #politics #health #ConspiracyTheories #psychology
 
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