Skip to main content

Search

Items tagged with: plastic


 
.

Tags: #biodiversity #extinction #biodiversiteit #oceans #oceanen #pollution #vervuiling #plastic #plastic waste #plastic afval #waste #afval

 
Bild/Foto

Stop using single use plastics!
Shoppers worldwide are using approximately 500 billion plastic bags a year. That's a 150 bags a year for every person on earth. Over 100,000 marine creatures and over 1 million sea birds die because of plastic yearly. If you conscioulsy use plastic without trying to switch to eco-friendly resources you are responsible for marine life deaths.
#marinelife #plastic #plasticbag #seabird #environment #environmentalist #earthday #earth #ecosia #sustainable #zerowaste #climatechange #globalwarming #extinctionrebellion #fridaysforfuture #plasticfree #saveourplanet #vegan #renewable

 
Bild/Foto

Stop using single use plastics!
Shoppers worldwide are using approximately 500 billion plastic bags a year. That's a 150 bags a year for every person on earth. Over 100,000 marine creatures and over 1 million sea birds die because of plastic yearly. If you conscioulsy use plastic without trying to switch to eco-friendly resources you are responsible for marine life deaths.
#marinelife #plastic #plasticbag #seabird #environment #environmentalist #earthday #earth #ecosia #sustainable #zerowaste #climatechange #globalwarming #extinctionrebellion #fridaysforfuture #plasticfree #saveourplanet #vegan #renewable

 

▶ 🇮🇹-Abbiamo deciso di pubblicare questo video per mostrare i danni che oggetti semplici come una busta di...


Bild/Foto

🇮🇹-Abbiamo deciso di pubblicare questo video per mostrare i danni che oggetti semplici come una busta di plastica possono provocare agli animali.
Nella nostra vita quotidiana cerchiamo di ridurre il nostro impatto ambientale non acquistando plastica usa e getta.
Anche una busta in meno può fare la differenza.
.
.
🇬🇧-We have decided to publish this video to show the damage that simple objects like a plastic bag can cause to animals.
In our daily life we try to reduce our environmental impact by not buying disposable plastic.
Even one less bag can make the difference.
.
.
.
.
Video by @5minutebeachcleanup
#ecologicamentea0 #earthday #ecology #rubbish #plastic #plasticfree #globalwarming #likeforlikes #pollution #waste #savetheplanet #savetheworld #greenenergy #cigarette #ecologia #climatestrike #plasticbottle #sea #saveocean #fridaysforfuture #zerowaste #fridayforfuture #climatestrike #raccoltadifferenziata #saveearth #greenpeace #lesswaste #inquinamento #gretathunberg

 
Bild/Foto

#Repost @gretathunberg
• • • • • •
The top 5 most important issues for the #EUelections2019 :

1. Climate and ecological breakdown

2. Climate and ecological breakdown

3. Climate and ecological breakdown

4. Climate and ecological breakdown

5. Climate and ecological breakdown

6. Climate and ecological breakdown

And the rest should mostly be about the climate and ecological breakdown.

Because if we fail to start the rapid transformation of our society within the upcoming 5 years then basically nothing else will matter in the future. #gretathunberg
#fridaysforfuture #schoolstrike4climate #climatestrike #thebrave #greatbigstory #gretathunberg #savetheplanet #reduce #reusa #recicla #reciclaje
#plasticfreeoceans #parlamentoeuropeo #plasticocean #plastic #savetheoceans #medioambiente #economiacircular #vulereciclaje #fridaysforfuture #ecofriendly #ecofriendlyliving #nature #naturephotography

 
Bild/Foto

True words: Twenty-five years ago people could be excused for not knowing much, or doing much, about climate change. Today we have no excuse. If you really think that the environment is less important than the economy, try holding your breath while you count your money. 🙏🏼🌍 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - #climatechange #demonstration #fridaysforfuture #climate #klima #klimawandel #education #plastic #nature #change #environment #animals #trump #arctic #climateaction #science #germany #help #children #educationforall #humanrights #security #health #paris

 

Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse


George Monbiot (The Guardian)

No one is coming to save us. Mass civil disobedience is essential to force a political response.

Had we put as much effort into preventing environmental catastrophe as we’ve spent on making excuses for inaction, we would have solved it by now. Everywhere I look, I see people engaged in furious attempts to fend off the moral challenge it presents.

The commonest current excuse is this: “I bet those protesters have phones/go on holiday/wear leather shoes.” In other words, we won’t listen to anyone who is not living naked in a barrel, subsisting only on murky water. Of course, if you are living naked in a barrel we will dismiss you too, because you’re a hippie weirdo. Every messenger, and every message they bear, is disqualified on the grounds of either impurity or purity. (...)

The political class, as anyone who has followed its progress over the past three years can surely now see, is chaotic, unwilling and, in isolation, strategically incapable of addressing even short-term crises, let alone a vast existential predicament. Yet a widespread and wilful naivety prevails: the belief that voting is the only political action required to change a system. (...)

The media, with a few exceptions, is actively hostile. Even when broadcasters cover these issues, they carefully avoid any mention of power, talking about environmental collapse as if it is driven by mysterious, passive forces, and proposing microscopic fixes for vast structural problems. The BBC’s Blue Planet Live series exemplified this tendency. (...)

Catastrophe afflicts people now and, unlike those in the rich world who can still afford to wallow in despair, they are forced to respond in practical ways. In Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi, devastated by Cyclone Idai, in Syria, Libya and Yemen, where climate chaos has contributed to civil war, in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador,, where crop failure, drought and the collapse of fisheries have driven people from their homes, despair is not an option. Our inaction has forced them into action, as they respond to terrifying circumstances caused primarily by the rich world’s consumption. (...)

Our system – characterised by perpetual economic growth on a planet that is not growing – will inevitably implode. The only question is whether the transformation is planned or unplanned. Our task is to ensure it is planned, and fast. We need to conceive and build a new system based on the principle that every generation, everywhere has an equal right to enjoy natural wealth. (...)

The time for excuses is over. The struggle to overthrow our life-denying system has begun.

Full article



‘Catastrophe afflicts people now and, unlike those in the rich world who can still afford to wallow in despair, they are forced to respond in practical ways.’ Photograph: Guillem Sartorio/AFP/Getty Images

Tags: #climate #climate change #global warming #plastic pollution #ozone layer #waste #pollution #environment #nuclear waste #politics #media #news media #journalism #journalist #power #protest #bbc #blue planet #

 

Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse


George Monbiot (The Guardian)

No one is coming to save us. Mass civil disobedience is essential to force a political response.

Had we put as much effort into preventing environmental catastrophe as we’ve spent on making excuses for inaction, we would have solved it by now. Everywhere I look, I see people engaged in furious attempts to fend off the moral challenge it presents.

The commonest current excuse is this: “I bet those protesters have phones/go on holiday/wear leather shoes.” In other words, we won’t listen to anyone who is not living naked in a barrel, subsisting only on murky water. Of course, if you are living naked in a barrel we will dismiss you too, because you’re a hippie weirdo. Every messenger, and every message they bear, is disqualified on the grounds of either impurity or purity. (...)

The political class, as anyone who has followed its progress over the past three years can surely now see, is chaotic, unwilling and, in isolation, strategically incapable of addressing even short-term crises, let alone a vast existential predicament. Yet a widespread and wilful naivety prevails: the belief that voting is the only political action required to change a system. (...)

The media, with a few exceptions, is actively hostile. Even when broadcasters cover these issues, they carefully avoid any mention of power, talking about environmental collapse as if it is driven by mysterious, passive forces, and proposing microscopic fixes for vast structural problems. The BBC’s Blue Planet Live series exemplified this tendency. (...)

Catastrophe afflicts people now and, unlike those in the rich world who can still afford to wallow in despair, they are forced to respond in practical ways. In Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi, devastated by Cyclone Idai, in Syria, Libya and Yemen, where climate chaos has contributed to civil war, in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador,, where crop failure, drought and the collapse of fisheries have driven people from their homes, despair is not an option. Our inaction has forced them into action, as they respond to terrifying circumstances caused primarily by the rich world’s consumption. (...)

Our system – characterised by perpetual economic growth on a planet that is not growing – will inevitably implode. The only question is whether the transformation is planned or unplanned. Our task is to ensure it is planned, and fast. We need to conceive and build a new system based on the principle that every generation, everywhere has an equal right to enjoy natural wealth. (...)

The time for excuses is over. The struggle to overthrow our life-denying system has begun.

Full article



‘Catastrophe afflicts people now and, unlike those in the rich world who can still afford to wallow in despair, they are forced to respond in practical ways.’ Photograph: Guillem Sartorio/AFP/Getty Images

Tags: #climate #climate change #global warming #plastic pollution #ozone layer #waste #pollution #environment #nuclear waste #politics #media #news media #journalism #journalist #power #protest #bbc #blue planet #

 
After #plastic (if you missd it), another alert ringing #Nano
Long lecture, so... concentrate, and/or listen twice ;-)


 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.

 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.

 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.