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The flagrant fact of racism: "White begin and always win"... or Why black king always suck?

If you are worried that the game of chess is racist, please take up Go, where black moves first, instead of looking foolish by wasting taxpayer money at a state broadcaster to "investigate" it!



(Garry Kasparov, a Russian chess grandmaster, former World Chess Champion, writer, and political activist, whom many consider to be the greatest chess player of all time)

John Adams slams ABC Sydney radio show for discussion over whether chess is ‘racist’

A Sydney radio station has come under fire from a former player for organising a segment to discuss whether chess was racist.

Former Australian chess representative John Adams has slammed the ABC for organising a radio segment discussing whether the popular board game is racist.

Professional economist Adams received a call from a Sydney-based ABC producer on Tuesday asking whether the game was racist because white always moves first.

“I just received a phone call from an ABC Sydney based producer seeking a comment about the game of chess,” Adams posted to Twitter.

“The ABC have taken the view that chess is RACIST given that white always go first!“

“They are seeking comment from a chess official as to whether the rules of chess need to be altered!“

“Trust the taxpayer-funded national broadcaster to apply ideological Marxist frameworks to anything and everything in Australia!“

“With all the drama resulting from COVID-19, I am amazed that the ABC is broadcasting on irrelevant topics!”

— John Adams (@adamseconomics) June 23, 2020

Teaching my child to play chess this week and it was proposed to me that I should change the rule that says “white always gets to go first”. Please help me understand whether this is a long-overdue correction of past injustice, or just political correctness gone mad.

— Stuart Khan (@stukhan) June 22, 2020

The Daily Telegraph reported James Valentine’s afternoon program on ABC Sydney would run the segment on Wednesday.

The move comes amid a wider debate about racist attitudes in society sparked by the death of African-American man George Floyd in the US at the hands of a white police officer.

The ensuing protests have led many to question their own behaviour and seen statues toppled, episodes removed from streaming services and brand names such as ”Redskins” changed.

But Adams condemned the ABC for not focusing on “bigger issues” amid a global health pandemic, accusing the radio broadcaster of reporting “bulls”.

“They said with everything going on, they wanted to have a conversation about white going first — and the racial context of whether white should go first,” Adams told The Daily Telegraph.

“The response to the tweet showed that common sense is prevailing. People want the national broadcaster to focus on bigger issues.

“People are struggling with the economy, with their health, with the lockdown. They don’t want their money wasted on bulls
.”
MORE: https://www.news.com.au/sport/more-sports/john-adams-slams-abc-sydney-radio-show-for-discussion-over-whether-chess-is-racist/news-story/5a4b7fa1e996810dde60fc5f4d9fff48

#fuck #fuck-twice #sjw #black #wite #chess #picture #human rights #photo #Australia #sport #activist #activism #blacklivesmatter #news #racism #racist
 
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20 Artists’ Visions of Alice in Wonderland From the Last 155 Years

"Curiouser and Curiouser!"


By Emily Temple
May 4, 2020

It was 155 years ago today, on May 4th, 1865, when Alice tumbled down the rabbit hole.



Carroll chose the day because it was Alice Liddell’s birthday (in 1865, she turned 13). Since then, Alice and her compatriots have been reimagined countless times, and inspired creative work of just about every genre. These days, it feels like we’re all down one rabbit hole or another, so it seemed just as good a time as any to revisit some of the best artistic treatments Alice and the gang have gotten over the years, from the classic Tenniel illustrations to moody drawings by Mervyn Peake (yes, that Mervyn Peake) to creations filtered by Yayoi Kusama’s bright, bubbly brain. Down you go.

MORE: 20 wonderful collections!


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Photo: Lewis Carroll, 1858. Alice Liddell as a beggar girl. This was first published in Carroll's biography by his nephew: Collingwood, Stuart Dodgson (1898) The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll, Q84: T. Fisher Unwin.

MORE:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Liddel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Carroll
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice%27s_Adventures_in_Wonderland

DOWNLOAD:

PDF - 15.1 Mb. First editions of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There With 92 Illustrations by Tenniel, 1866/1872.


#Alice #Wonferland #book #literature #prose #tale #picture #photo #news #Carroll #GB #England #news #exhibition #paint #painter #Britain
 
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V-J Day in Times Square


Alfred Eisenstaedt (December 6, 1898 – August 23, 1995) was a German-born American photographer and photojournalist. He began his career in Germany prior to World War II but achieved prominence as a staff photographer for Life magazine after moving to the U.S. Life featured more than 90 of his pictures on its covers, and more than 2,500 of his photo stories were published.

Among his most famous cover photographs was V-J Day in Times Square, taken during the V-J Day celebration in New York City, showing American sailor George Mendonsa kissing dental assistant Greta Zimmer Friedman in a "dancelike dip" which "summed up the euphoria many Americans felt as the war came to a close", in the words of his obituary. He was "renowned for his ability to capture memorable images of important people in the news" and for his candid photographs taken with a small 35mm Leica camera, typically with natural lighting.




George Mendonsa and Greta Zimmer Friedman
Photo: Veterans History Project/Library of Congress, 1980

MORE:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Eisenstaedt
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V-J_Day_in_Times_Square
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greta_Zimmer_Friedman

(c) Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt, taken on V-J Day, 1945 (from Life Magazine).
This image is a faithful digitisation of a unique historic image, and the copyright for it is most likely held by the person who created the image or the agency employing the person. It is believed that the use of this image may qualify as fair use under the Copyright law of the United States.

#War #V-J #Victory #USA #photo #picture #image #life #Eisenstaedt #jew #jewish #hebrew #NewYork #Germany #journalism #army #navy
 
Now that is one photograph.

https://petapixel.com/2020/05/04/photographer-captures-the-iss-flying-across-the-face-of-the-sun/

#justwow #sun #iss #picture
Photographer Captures the ISS Flying Across the Face of the Sun
 
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Pʅαƈҽ ԃҽ Vαɳɳҽʂ

Mons / Bergen (Belgique, België, Belgium, Belgien, Belgio)

Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (1) [full size image]

Bild/Foto Les cerisiers du Japon sont maintenant en fleurs !
Bild/Foto De Japanse sierkersen (of de Japanse kerselaars [Begisch-Nederlands]) staan nu in bloei !
Bild/Foto The Japanese cherry trees are in blossom now !
Bild/Foto Die japanischen Blütenkirschen blühen im Moment so schön !
Bild/Foto I ciliegi giapponesi sono adesso in fiore !



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (2) [full size image]



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (3) [full size image]



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (4)



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (5)

MONS
COLLECTIONS : #mons belgium docnederlands #mywork docnl
#photography #photographie #fotografie #fotografia #photo #photos #foto #fotos #picture #pictures #image #images #mons #bergen #city #cities #ville #villes #stad #steden #stadt #städte #città #ciudad #belgium #belgique #belgië #belgien #belgio #bélgica #français #nederlands #english #deutsch #italiano #mywork #montravail #myphoto #maphoto #mijnwerk #meinearbeit #voyage #voyages #reis #reizen #trip #trips #travel #travels #journey #journeys #reise #reisen #viaggio #viaggi #tourisme #toerisme #tourism #sightseeing #tourismus #fremdenverkehr #turismo #rue #straat #street #straße #strada #lente #voorjaar #printemps #spring #frühling #frühjahr #primavera #park #parc #parco #fleur #fleurs #bloem #bloemen #flower #flowers #blume #blumen #fiore #fiori #place #square #plein #platz #piazza #arbre #arbres #boom #bomen #tree #trees #baum #bäume #albero #alberi
 
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Pʅαƈҽ ԃҽ Vαɳɳҽʂ

Mons / Bergen (Belgique, België, Belgium, Belgien, Belgio)

Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (1) [full size image]

Bild/Foto Les cerisiers du Japon sont maintenant en fleurs !
Bild/Foto De Japanse sierkersen (of de Japanse kerselaars [Begisch-Nederlands]) staan nu in bloei !
Bild/Foto The Japanese cherry trees are in blossom now !
Bild/Foto Die japanischen Blütenkirschen blühen im Moment so schön !
Bild/Foto I ciliegi giapponesi sono adesso in fiore !



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (2) [full size image]



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (3) [full size image]



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (4)



Bild/FotoPlace de Vannes (5)

MONS
COLLECTIONS : #mons belgium docnederlands #mywork docnl
#photography #photographie #fotografie #fotografia #photo #photos #foto #fotos #picture #pictures #image #images #mons #bergen #city #cities #ville #villes #stad #steden #stadt #städte #città #ciudad #belgium #belgique #belgië #belgien #belgio #bélgica #français #nederlands #english #deutsch #italiano #mywork #montravail #myphoto #maphoto #mijnwerk #meinearbeit #voyage #voyages #reis #reizen #trip #trips #travel #travels #journey #journeys #reise #reisen #viaggio #viaggi #tourisme #toerisme #tourism #sightseeing #tourismus #fremdenverkehr #turismo #rue #straat #street #straße #strada #lente #voorjaar #printemps #spring #frühling #frühjahr #primavera #park #parc #parco #fleur #fleurs #bloem #bloemen #flower #flowers #blume #blumen #fiore #fiori #place #square #plein #platz #piazza #arbre #arbres #boom #bomen #tree #trees #baum #bäume #albero #alberi
 
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The 6 April 1968, just two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, 17 year old Black Panther "Little" Bobby Hutton was murdered by police in Oakland, California.


Hutton had been the very first recruit to the Black Panther Party. He had been involved in a shootout with police until he surrendered. He left his weapon, took off his shirt and emerged from the basement where he was holed up, barechested with his hands up.
He had been advised by a comrade to surrender naked, but he was embarrassed and left his trousers on. Police shot him at least 10 times, killing him.
Six days later, over 1000 people came to his funeral, at which actor Marlon Brando delivered the eulogy.
His killing spurred rapid growth of the BPP.

You can learn more about the Panthers in these books by former members of the group:
https://shop.workingclasshistory.com/collections/all/black-panthers

#history #blm #black #mlk #BPP #panther #Oakland #California
#police #acab #cops #Brando #picture #photo
 
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Kurdish anti fascist volunteer unit in Raqqa - 2017


They all survived Raqqa. Third from the left was killed defending Afrin in 2018 from the Turkish Military and their Jihadist proxies, fifth from the right was killed defending Serikanye from the same groups in 2019.

#picture #photo #history #military #volunteer #antifa #Kurdish #Kurd
#Raqqa #Afrin #Serikanye #Rojava
#Turkey #ISIS
 
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Kurdish anti fascist volunteer unit in Raqqa - 2017


They all survived Raqqa. Third from the left was killed defending Afrin in 2018 from the Turkish Military and their Jihadist proxies, fifth from the right was killed defending Serikanye from the same groups in 2019.

#picture #photo #history #military #volunteer #antifa #Kurdish #Kurd
#Raqqua #Afrin #Serikanye #Rojava
#Turkey #ISIS
 

#Finding the #guy in the #most #famous #physics #picture #ever

#DrBecky #CERN #LHC #ATLAS #spiritofATLAS #Crew #Youtube #Claudia #Marcelloni de #Oliveira #Max #Maximillien #Brice #Marzio #Nessi .. #Two #Minutes .. #CLIC #Experiment .. #DrRogerRuber #Dr #Roger #Ruber #Uppsala #University #Sweden CLIC #Collaboration .. #Right #Person at the #Right #Time


Dr Roger Ruber website: https://katalog.uu.se/profile/?id=N94-1736_2
ATLAS experiment: https://atlas.cern/
Visiting CERN: https://visit.cern/

Dr Beckys new book 'Space: The 10 Things You Should Know' is out now worldwide (except US & Canada)!
You can find it on amazon here: http://bit.ly/SpaceDrBecky
 

Filtered word: nsfw

 
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For Isaac Asimov, Galactic Talmudist, on his 100th birthday


Name in native language: Исаак Юдович Азимов

Native language: Yiddish

Date of birth: c. 1920 (before 1920, after 1919), Petrovichi (Russia)

Date of death: 6 April 1992, Brooklyn (New York City)

Country of citizenship:
  • Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
  • United States of America
Residence:
  • Brooklyn
  • Petrovichi
Educated at:
  • Columbia University (1939)
  • Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Columbia University School of Engineering
Occupation:
  • biochemist
  • novelist
  • prosaist
  • autobiographer
  • science fiction writer
  • science writer
  • screenwriter
  • non-fiction writer
  • university teacher
  • journalist
  • writer
Employer: Boston University

Member of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Field of work: biochemistry

Spouse: Janet Asimov (1973–1992)

Notable work:

Foundation series
I, Robot
Nightfall
Robot short stories
The Bicentennial Man
The Gods Themselves
The Intelligent Man's Guide to Science
Daniel Elkind. January 2, 2020

Editor’s Note: Isaac Asimov, whose 100th birthday falls on January 2, 2020, is one of very few popular authors whose published works far exceed their number of years on earth. By some counts, Asimov’s books nearly come to 500. A polymath of remarkable output, the writer, chemist and professor of biochemistry, who died in 1992 at the age of 72, taught, researched and — most of all — wrote with all the concentrated intensity of a star going supernova. And he was an eclectic imploding star: Scientific essays, histories, a guide to Shakespeare and sci-fi stories wherein he (like the Bard) coined household words like “Robotics,” now the name of an entire field. In this piece from 2009, Daniel Elkin, outlines the extraordinary life and Talmudic spirit of an American master of science fiction — much of which has since become science fact.

Between 1950 and 1969, Isaac Asimov became a publishing industry unto himself. From “Asimov’s Annotated Gilbert and Sullivan,” to “Isaac Asimov’s Book of Facts” and “Isaac Asimov’s Treasury of Humor,” he was celebrated as much for his success and prolificity as for his wit, curiosity and erudition. Photographers asked him to pose with his many books, and he obliged, wearing a grin both proud and credulous. On the cover of “Opus 100,” published in 1969 (Houghton Mifflin), he is pictured sitting at a desk between two endless stacks of books, sans notorious mutton chops, dressed in a suit and tie on the occasion of his 100th book in two decades. When Asimov appeared on “The David Frost Show,” the host asked if he believed in God. “I haven’t given it much thought,” he replied. But by then, “Dr. Asimov” had become a household name.

Asimov’s first novel, “Pebble in the Sky,” introduced America to the Galactic Empire — his de facto science-fictional universe — and to a not yet so self-assured 29-year-old Asimov, with the words: “Two minutes before he disappeared forever from the face of the Earth he knew, Joseph Schwartz strolled along the pleasant streets of suburban Chicago quoting Browning to himself.” Schwartz, we are told, is a retired tailor. The Robert Browning poem he’s reciting happens to be “Rabbi Ben Ezra.” And in an instant, Schwartz finds himself again an immigrant: this time, in an unknown future, on an earth too radioactive to sustain life beyond the age of 60.

Born near Smolensk, in Petrovichi, during the first years of the Soviet Union, Asimov’s first language was Yiddish, his eyes recessively blue and his Judaism casually latent: “… it may well be that many East European Jews are descended from Khazars and the people they ruled,” he later wrote, as a confirmed rationalist. “I may be one of them. Who knows? And who cares?” Upon arriving in New York in 1922, the young, preschool-age Asimov quickly taught himself English. Since his parents spoke only Russian and Yiddish, he began a course of Anglophile self-education at public libraries, first reading dictionaries, then the Greek myths and British classics.

The young George Gershwin converted to ragtime partly to escape the street, and Asimov converted himself to science to achieve a similar effect. This he did via Columbia University (his doctoral thesis was on “The Kinetics of the Reaction Inactivation of Tyrosinase During Its Catalysis of the Aerobic Oxidation of Catechol,” the first and worst-selling of his books) and one of several family candy stores on Decatur Street in Brooklyn. There he was first introduced to science fiction through such pulp magazines as Amazing Stories and Astounding Science Fiction — stories he would later defend on the grounds that “the age of the pulp magazine was the last in which youngsters, to get their primitive material, were forced to be literate.”

Intuitively threatened by looking’s supremacy over reading, he went on to publish fiction and nonfiction at a vengeful rate, as if to stanch the attrition: His 200th book, “Opus 200,” was published in 1979, followed by “Opus 300” in 1984. Meanwhile, he maintained a life diametrically opposed to that of a typical writer, eventually making money by publishing books and working as a professional chemist by day, simply out of curiosity and passion. At the Naval Air Experimental Station in Philadelphia, probably the first and last time three sci-fi writers — Asimov, Robert Heinlein, and L. Sprague de Camp, author of “A Gun for Dinosaur” — were ever in charge of wartime weapons research, Asimov was, in fact, more inspired by theoretical premises than the performance of seam-sealing compounds: What if it were humans who had to come to the aid of foreign intelligences? (“Blind Alley”) What if Truman dropped the bomb? (“Pebble in the Sky”) Or what if a computer played the role of God? (“The Last Question”)

More Lithuanian than Polish — that is, more Misnaged than Hasid — science fiction writers rule a universe of which they are the sole intelligent designers, inscribing the Law on a parchment of space-time continuum composed of bizarre coincidences and fantastic exceptions derived entirely from our own planet and its latter day. The rules they set spring up like traps, inevitably ensnaring the 62-year-old retired tailors of the world in the nightmare of a life that ends at 60, and a fate that, like the Great Depression Asimov survived, happens to be both terrible and explicable. (It is said that, following Tsar Nicholas’s expulsion of the Jews from Russia, a rich landlord in Asimov’s birthplace conveniently shifted the border to the east of town from the west, therein annexing its residents, geographically, to the Pale of Settlement, while remaining, physically, within the margins of crown lands.)

Galactic Talmudists, it is the writers — not science — who rule science fiction, just as it’s the competing voices of commentators that create the echo of the Talmud: When Asimov coined the term “robotics,” he also enumerated its three standard laws, reminiscent of Rabbi Hillel and the exegetic penchant for threes: “A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.” Perhaps this preoccupation with the terrestrial and the worldly is why the genre turns so readily to social satire and dystopias — places that must exist, according to etymology and various destinies.

Asimov’s most popular sci-fi series, “Foundation,” for example, was inspired by the gloomy fate of Europe in 1941: Thinking of Edward Gibbon’s multivolume “History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire,” Asimov began his so-called “history of the future” in novel form, proposing a foundation at the borders of a galaxy where scientist-saviors convene to keep the Galactic Empire alive by compiling an encyclopedia of human knowledge to combat the encroachment of “feudalism,” or fascism.

The story “Jokester,” from Asimov’s later collection, “Earth Is Room Enough,” asks the seemingly innocent question, “Where do jokes come from?” And concludes, with sinister implications for human laughter, that the prototypes of our humor are of “extraterrestrial origin” — a laboratory experiment for alien psychologists. Thus the joke is on us: There will be no more jokes now. “The gift of humor is gone,” Trask said drearily. “No man will ever laugh again.”

Though Asimov’s dialogue was openly stilted and his style consciously antiquated from the first to the last bookend of his long career, and though he somehow always managed to make Jewish names sound futuristic, or merely Israeli — Abram Trask, Pola Shekt, Bel Arvardan — his presence can still be felt in the sympathy accorded Multivac, the story’s supercomputer and lonely-intelligent bearer of bad news (Asimov died of AIDS, which he contracted from a blood transfusion, in 1992). In the final sentence we can sense an allusion to the mysterious popularity of the author’s science, too: “And they remained there, staring, feeling the world shrink down to the dimensions of an experimental rat cage — with the maze removed and something, something about to be put in its place.”

MORE: https://forward.com/culture/437545/galactic-talmudist-isaac-asimov-100-birthday-foundations-science-fiction/
Photo: Phillip Leonian from New York World-Telegram & Sun.

#Isaac #Asimov #jewish #jew #hebrew #photo #picture #usa #news #science #writer #book #non-fiction #literature #journalism #birthday #story
 
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