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Italians are looking on aghast at the #UK's #coronavirus response | Antonello Guerrera | #Opinion | The Guardian


On my bike ride today, I saw several families just strolling about like it was just an ordinary, lazy Sunday afternoon.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/10/italians-uk-coronavirus-response-boris-johnson-government-covid-19

#Pandemic
 

Italians are looking on aghast at the #UK's #coronavirus response | Antonello Guerrera | #Opinion | The Guardian


On my bike ride today, I saw several families just strolling about like it was just an ordinary, lazy Sunday afternoon.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/10/italians-uk-coronavirus-response-boris-johnson-government-covid-19

#Pandemic
 

Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home!





I'm sick. Super sick. So sick, in fact, that I can't even think of a funny simile for just how sick I am. And for me, that's sick. And though I've not been tested for COVID-19, the global pandemic coronavirus that's currently dominating the news cycle, I've decided to follow the unofficial protocol and "self-quarantine" in my home anyway. This could present a boring proposition. But being a photographer, I've got plenty to keep me occupied.

It looks like more and more of us are going to be "quarantined" in the coming months, voluntarily for now, who knows in the future. If you're a photo geek and you're panicked about being trapped inside with nothing to do, these suggested photo activities may help you fend off cabin fever (we can't do anything about that real fever). Here are five photo projects we can all tackle without ever leaving the house.

[ For the record, I didn 't rush out and panic buy the gloves and N95 mask used in the article's lead image. I have these from a former life - the day job that I quit to run my camera business. Don't judge.]


Try to Make a Good Self Portrait


Photographers love self portraits. How many of us have shot a bathroom mirror selfie with every new camera we've bought? Most of us, I'd guess. But making a really excellent self portrait? That's a lot harder.

Harder, but not impossible. There exist a number of excellent self portraits in the history of the craft. Just look at the self portrait works of Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Vivian Maier, Diane Arbus, and Andy Warhol. Cindy Sherman made a life-long career out of self portraits, with one example Untitled #96 , selling for $3.89 million in 2011. These works of art are a far cry from the snapshots we're making in the bathroom, and even if we'll never reach the rarified heights of the masters, we can at least try to inch our photos farther from "selfie" along the quality spectrum, and a bit closer to "self portrait."

Self portraits are more than just a snapshot with the camera aimed back at the shooter. Self portraits often dive deep into the headspace of the one taking the photo, or offer commentary on society, or explore the photographer's own internal emotions. Self portraits can be made to share, or kept private; a product for consumption, or a personal reflection. Being stuck at home is a great opportunity to think deeply about what you can say with a self portrait, and then work on making it. There are no rules to making a self portrait, except that you must be taking a photo of yourself. You can use any camera, any props, any lighting, any perspective, as long as you're the subject.

I recently made a self-portrait at home for use in an article I wrote, and the idea was to demonstrate that my whole world is made of cameras. I'm obsessed with cameras. They surround me and press upon me. I love them, but I can't escape them even when I want to. That photo is included above. It's nothing special, but it did require some work (I arranged the cameras, set my camera and lens above me using a tripod and boom, and then laid down on top of the cameras in the dark with a soft light blazing to my left). The result may not be art, but it took some effort and it's at least closer to "self-portrait" than it is to "selfie." That's a good first step.


Macro Photography In and Around the Home


Macro photography is great for many reasons, but there are two reasons that it's particularly well-suited for photographers who are stuck in and around their home. The first, is that the look and feel of macro photos can vary wildly over a span of mere feet. It's easy to find countless subjects, vastly different light, and hundreds of unique images within the space of a small home.

The second reason that macro photography is a great pursuit when we're stuck in and around the home is that it's incredibly easy to get lost for hours shooting macro photos. Tweaking the aperture to get the right depth of field, shuffling around for that perfect point of focus, and taking hundreds of shots in the pursuit of that one dynamic macro photo takes time. Lots of time. This is especially true when the subject is a living creature. I once spent an hour lying on my back in a flower bed with my lens pointed upward, bees careening through the air around me, hoping to get a single photo of a bee in flight with the sun blazing through its translucent wings. I never got the shot that I'd envisioned, and I still want to get it. But I did get a great photo of my daughter's eye yesterday.

If you already own a macro lens, mount that thing and get shooting. If you don't have a macro lens, don't worry. They're not totally necessary to making great macro photos, as I demonstrated in this article on close-up filters. Grab a cheap set of close-up filters from Amazon (or from our online shop here) and you'll be shooting macro photos as soon as the postman cometh.





Experiment with Alternative Processes


Bored with regular old digital and film photography? Use this time stuck in your home to experiment with alternative processes. We've written articles on "Souping Film," the process of treating your film with chemicals or organic solvents prior to shooting and developing. These pre-treatments add unpredictability and wild visual elements into the final images made on film. Various types of tea, wine, beer, household cleaners, and plenty of other soup recipes have been used to make some wild film photos, and you can see some of these in detail in our article on the subject.

Last year, Charlotte wrote a piece on free-lensing, an alternative shooting process that's easy to learn, hard to master. Free-lensing is the act of shooting your camera with the lens detached and held at angles to the film or sensor plane. This creates selective focus, lens flares, light leaks, and other optical aberrations which can be embraced or used in a deliberate way to create a unique image.

Alternative processes don't necessarily need to be lofty and ambitious. This could be as simple as choosing to shoot a film type, camera type, or lens focal length that you don't normally shoot. An example - one of our writer's, Corey, recently used a pinhole camera to shoot a still life triptych or a flower over the course of two weeks; one photo before it bloomed, one at the height of its bloom, and one after it had wilted. The point here is that we've got time to kill. Why not do something with it that you don't normally do?


Try Astrophotography


Stuck inside for days and tired of looking at the people you live with? Go outside and look at the sky, and then take pictures of it! Astrophotography is easy to get into it, so don't be intimidated. The shot above was my first ever attempt at astro photography, made with a 15mm Voigtlander lens and a Sony a7. You don't need much gear to make decent astro photos. You'll want a digital camera for this, and your best lens will be a wide angle lens with a fast aperture (the faster the better), and you'll also want a solid tripod. But that's all you'll need to get started.

Point your camera at the sky, set it to manual, and start shooting. You'll need specific settings of ISO, shutter speed, and aperture in order to get a good photo with bright pinprick stars. A successful astro photo depends heavily on variables that we can't possibly anticipate for each of you while writing this article. You'll just need to get out there and experiment. For a closer look at what it takes to make a great astro photo, please visit my pal Abdul Dremali's website. He's made some of the best astro photos I've seen, and his helpful blog post fro astro beginners will get you started on the path to doing the same.


Learn to Develop Film at Home


This is a perfect use of quarantine time. Time that might otherwise be wasted is now repurposed to learn a new skill, one that will last a lifetime. That's great! Developing black and white film at home is simple, takes about twenty minutes, requires just a few specialized tools, will save you money on lab costs, and allows greater control over our work. That's a lot of positives.

If you've never developed film at home, don't worry. We wrote a pretty useful guide to getting started that you can reference here. It'll tell you everything you'll need to buy, where to buy it (online), and how to develop your first rolls of film. We also wrote an article on Ilford's Simplicity developing starter packs. Check that out and see if it's something that works for you.

Bonus Activities


There's a lot more that we can do with this time. Practice product photography. Take a great photo of a banana. Try time-lapse photography. Clean your cameras and lenses. Set up a strobe, a glass of water, a backdrop, a soft light, and try to catch the exact moment that a drop of water splashes into a cup of water (I'll be doing this tomorrow). Catch up on the hundreds of camera and lens reviews we've published. Use a window light to make portraits of your family or pets, or your favorite gear. Shoot an entire day at home on film. Document Your Life, as Matt Day says. There's so much that we can do at home, photographically.

And if all of that fails to spark your interest, there's always online shopping. Find a new camera or lens on eBay, or browse the inventory at our own F Stop Cameras.

Or, hey, just do what I'll be doing and watch Frozen 2 for the tenth, twentieth, and fiftieth times. Love that Olaf. Let us know what you do photographically during the doldrums of life in the comments below.

Follow Casual Photophile on Facebook and Instagram


[ Some of the links in this article will direct users to our affiliates atB&H Photo, Amazon, and eBay. By purchasing anything using these links, Casual Photophile may receive a small commission at no additional charge to you. This helps Casual Photophile produce the content we produce. Many thanks for your support.]

The post Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home! appeared first on Casual Photophile.

#musings #opinion #covid19
posted by pod_feeder_v2
Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home!
 

Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home!





I'm sick. Super sick. So sick, in fact, that I can't even think of a funny simile for just how sick I am. And for me, that's sick. And though I've not been tested for COVID-19, the global pandemic coronavirus that's currently dominating the news cycle, I've decided to follow the unofficial protocol and "self-quarantine" in my home anyway. This could present a boring proposition. But being a photographer, I've got plenty to keep me occupied.

It looks like more and more of us are going to be "quarantined" in the coming months, voluntarily for now, who knows in the future. If you're a photo geek and you're panicked about being trapped inside with nothing to do, these suggested photo activities may help you fend off cabin fever (we can't do anything about that real fever). Here are five photo projects we can all tackle without ever leaving the house.

[ For the record, I didn 't rush out and panic buy the gloves and N95 mask used in the article's lead image. I have these from a former life - the day job that I quit to run my camera business. Don't judge.]


Try to Make a Good Self Portrait


Photographers love self portraits. How many of us have shot a bathroom mirror selfie with every new camera we've bought? Most of us, I'd guess. But making a really excellent self portrait? That's a lot harder.

Harder, but not impossible. There exist a number of excellent self portraits in the history of the craft. Just look at the self portrait works of Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Vivian Maier, Diane Arbus, and Andy Warhol. Cindy Sherman made a life-long career out of self portraits, with one example Untitled #96 , selling for $3.89 million in 2011. These works of art are a far cry from the snapshots we're making in the bathroom, and even if we'll never reach the rarified heights of the masters, we can at least try to inch our photos farther from "selfie" along the quality spectrum, and a bit closer to "self portrait."

Self portraits are more than just a snapshot with the camera aimed back at the shooter. Self portraits often dive deep into the headspace of the one taking the photo, or offer commentary on society, or explore the photographer's own internal emotions. Self portraits can be made to share, or kept private; a product for consumption, or a personal reflection. Being stuck at home is a great opportunity to think deeply about what you can say with a self portrait, and then work on making it. There are no rules to making a self portrait, except that you must be taking a photo of yourself. You can use any camera, any props, any lighting, any perspective, as long as you're the subject.

I recently made a self-portrait at home for use in an article I wrote, and the idea was to demonstrate that my whole world is made of cameras. I'm obsessed with cameras. They surround me and press upon me. I love them, but I can't escape them even when I want to. That photo is included above. It's nothing special, but it did require some work (I arranged the cameras, set my camera and lens above me using a tripod and boom, and then laid down on top of the cameras in the dark with a soft light blazing to my left). The result may not be art, but it took some effort and it's at least closer to "self-portrait" than it is to "selfie." That's a good first step.


Macro Photography In and Around the Home


Macro photography is great for many reasons, but there are two reasons that it's particularly well-suited for photographers who are stuck in and around their home. The first, is that the look and feel of macro photos can vary wildly over a span of mere feet. It's easy to find countless subjects, vastly different light, and hundreds of unique images within the space of a small home.

The second reason that macro photography is a great pursuit when we're stuck in and around the home is that it's incredibly easy to get lost for hours shooting macro photos. Tweaking the aperture to get the right depth of field, shuffling around for that perfect point of focus, and taking hundreds of shots in the pursuit of that one dynamic macro photo takes time. Lots of time. This is especially true when the subject is a living creature. I once spent an hour lying on my back in a flower bed with my lens pointed upward, bees careening through the air around me, hoping to get a single photo of a bee in flight with the sun blazing through its translucent wings. I never got the shot that I'd envisioned, and I still want to get it. But I did get a great photo of my daughter's eye yesterday.

If you already own a macro lens, mount that thing and get shooting. If you don't have a macro lens, don't worry. They're not totally necessary to making great macro photos, as I demonstrated in this article on close-up filters. Grab a cheap set of close-up filters from Amazon (or from our online shop here) and you'll be shooting macro photos as soon as the postman cometh.





Experiment with Alternative Processes


Bored with regular old digital and film photography? Use this time stuck in your home to experiment with alternative processes. We've written articles on "Souping Film," the process of treating your film with chemicals or organic solvents prior to shooting and developing. These pre-treatments add unpredictability and wild visual elements into the final images made on film. Various types of tea, wine, beer, household cleaners, and plenty of other soup recipes have been used to make some wild film photos, and you can see some of these in detail in our article on the subject.

Last year, Charlotte wrote a piece on free-lensing, an alternative shooting process that's easy to learn, hard to master. Free-lensing is the act of shooting your camera with the lens detached and held at angles to the film or sensor plane. This creates selective focus, lens flares, light leaks, and other optical aberrations which can be embraced or used in a deliberate way to create a unique image.

Alternative processes don't necessarily need to be lofty and ambitious. This could be as simple as choosing to shoot a film type, camera type, or lens focal length that you don't normally shoot. An example - one of our writer's, Corey, recently used a pinhole camera to shoot a still life triptych or a flower over the course of two weeks; one photo before it bloomed, one at the height of its bloom, and one after it had wilted. The point here is that we've got time to kill. Why not do something with it that you don't normally do?


Try Astrophotography


Stuck inside for days and tired of looking at the people you live with? Go outside and look at the sky, and then take pictures of it! Astrophotography is easy to get into it, so don't be intimidated. The shot above was my first ever attempt at astro photography, made with a 15mm Voigtlander lens and a Sony a7. You don't need much gear to make decent astro photos. You'll want a digital camera for this, and your best lens will be a wide angle lens with a fast aperture (the faster the better), and you'll also want a solid tripod. But that's all you'll need to get started.

Point your camera at the sky, set it to manual, and start shooting. You'll need specific settings of ISO, shutter speed, and aperture in order to get a good photo with bright pinprick stars. A successful astro photo depends heavily on variables that we can't possibly anticipate for each of you while writing this article. You'll just need to get out there and experiment. For a closer look at what it takes to make a great astro photo, please visit my pal Abdul Dremali's website. He's made some of the best astro photos I've seen, and his helpful blog post fro astro beginners will get you started on the path to doing the same.


Learn to Develop Film at Home


This is a perfect use of quarantine time. Time that might otherwise be wasted is now repurposed to learn a new skill, one that will last a lifetime. That's great! Developing black and white film at home is simple, takes about twenty minutes, requires just a few specialized tools, will save you money on lab costs, and allows greater control over our work. That's a lot of positives.

If you've never developed film at home, don't worry. We wrote a pretty useful guide to getting started that you can reference here. It'll tell you everything you'll need to buy, where to buy it (online), and how to develop your first rolls of film. We also wrote an article on Ilford's Simplicity developing starter packs. Check that out and see if it's something that works for you.

Bonus Activities


There's a lot more that we can do with this time. Practice product photography. Take a great photo of a banana. Try time-lapse photography. Clean your cameras and lenses. Set up a strobe, a glass of water, a backdrop, a soft light, and try to catch the exact moment that a drop of water splashes into a cup of water (I'll be doing this tomorrow). Catch up on the hundreds of camera and lens reviews we've published. Use a window light to make portraits of your family or pets, or your favorite gear. Shoot an entire day at home on film. Document Your Life, as Matt Day says. There's so much that we can do at home, photographically.

And if all of that fails to spark your interest, there's always online shopping. Find a new camera or lens on eBay, or browse the inventory at our own F Stop Cameras.

Or, hey, just do what I'll be doing and watch Frozen 2 for the tenth, twentieth, and fiftieth times. Love that Olaf. Let us know what you do photographically during the doldrums of life in the comments below.

Follow Casual Photophile on Facebook and Instagram


[ Some of the links in this article will direct users to our affiliates atB&H Photo, Amazon, and eBay. By purchasing anything using these links, Casual Photophile may receive a small commission at no additional charge to you. This helps Casual Photophile produce the content we produce. Many thanks for your support.]

The post Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home! appeared first on Casual Photophile.

#musings #opinion #covid19
posted by pod_feeder_v2
Quarantined? Here Are Five Photography Projects You Can Do From Home!
 
In fact, despite the Thuringia furore, recent research suggests CDU-AfD collaboration is already happening in 18 municipalities. This is recognition of a grim political reality: if the CDU is to remain relevant, it may have to abandon Merkel’s moderate conservatism and shift right, or risk being outflanked.
#TheGuardian #Opinion #Germany #CDU #Europe
 

Lo que voló con la bomba




(PD)

Este año se cumplieron 74 años de la bomba de Hiroshima. Ese día murieron 250000 personas en una fracción de segundo. Y cambió el mundo. De una forma tan dramática, que se hace difícil verlo hoy, porque cuesta imaginar un contexto diferente.

Junto con el nazismo, las armas nucleares fueron la principal justificación del movimiento anticientífico en la segunda mitad del siglo XX. La izquierda occidental mutó desde su falacia inicial de que marxismo era una teoría científica de la Historia, a su presente desvarío de que la ciencia es un invento capitalista.

Se generaron fábulas sobre cómo la ciencia había justificado al nazismo, cuando en los hechos esas justificaciones nunca tuvieron nada de científicas. Se inventó una visión de la ciencia como la responsable de la bomba atómica, algo que sonaría ridículo si no fuera porque está tan difundido. Peor aún, se creó una doctrina de responsabilidad social de los científicos, como si los logros científicos fueran inventos en lugar de descubrimientos, y entonces el científico pudiera elegir qué descubrir.



(PD)

Se empezó a juzgar a las ideas científicas en términos de su peligrosidad política, como si la realidad tuviera que ajustarse a la medida ideológica humana. En lugar de clarificar que el "racismo científico" nunca fue ciencia, prácticamente se prohibió pensar en el ser humano como un ente biológico. Todavía hoy quien hable de cualquier tipo de diferencia innata entre las personas, será inmediatamente y sin matices tildado de nazi.

Todo eso derivó en un anticientificismo militante, impulsado paradójicamente desde la izquierda y el progresismo en todos los niveles. Y es raro porque hasta la segunda guerra mundial eran los grandes estamentos conservadores los que propugnaban la irracionalidad y el pensamiento mágico en las clases populares. Luego de la Guerra en cambio, el progresismo se puso con entusiasmo la camiseta retrógrada que hasta hacía poco llevaban las iglesias y las oligarquías.



(PD)

El marasmo intelectual en el que el mundo está sumido, desde Trump hasta Macri, tiene mucho que ver con esa actitud de la izquierda de negación y rechazo hacia el conocimiento. En el paupérrimo nivel intelectual del debate público, en Argentina y en el mundo, tal negacionismo progresista tiene una enorme responsabilidad.

Por supuesto que la derecha ayudó, son banales pero no estúpidos. Adoptó el discurso ñoño del progresismo podando cualquier detalle monetario. Con la caída del muro y el fin de los estados comunistas que aún mantenían el positivismo como justificación, el pensamiento posmoderno se hizo dueño de la mente occidental.

Hoy en día el ciudadano de a pié no distingue la ciencia de cualquier cosa que haga un científico. Y lo triste es que buena parte de los académicos, en particular en las áreas humanas, tampoco. Entonces si un científico dice y hace algo deplorable su responsabilidad se traslada del ámbito personal al epistemológico. Fue "a ciencia la responsable del hecho, no la persona del científico.

Por ejemplo, los experimentos secretos con medicamentos en Centroamérica en los 70's no se discuten como responsabilidad de una decena de políticos y empresarios de EEUU, sino de la ciencia como modo de adquisición de conocimiento. Los 250000 muertos por la bomba de Hiroshima no se achacan a la ambición de poder de Harry Truman sino de la Teoría de la Relatividad y al pobre Albert Einstein.

Se asimila el realismo, la idea de que existe una realidad externa y que podemos entenderla, al autoritarismo de negar opiniones diferentes.

Al no distinguir la ciencia como método, de lo que haga cualquiera que se diga científico, se niega en carácter humano de los científicos. El científico hace ciencia cuando, en un laboratorio, aplica el método al conocimiento de la realidad. No cuando caga o cocina fideos.



(CC0)

Albert Einstein es un lindo ejemplo. Fue pacifista en todas las guerras, algo bastante generalizado en la comunidad científica de entonces y de ahora, que siempre fue muy internacional. De hecho, se opuso abiertamente a ambas guerras mundiales, lo que le valió el desprecio de muchos connacionales.

Su teoría de la Relatividad de 1905 decía que la materia y la energía eran la misma cosa, dos aspectos de la misma cantidad. A alguien se le ocurrió que si se pudiera extraer la energía contenida en un átomo, se podría hacer una bomba. Por supuesto, hecha esa propuesta, los estados imperiales empezaron a investigarla. Pero entre la teoría de la Relatividad y la explosión de Hiroshima pasaron 40 años. En esas décadas se descubrió nada menos que toda la Mecánica Cuántica. No hay absolutamente ningún modo en el que Einstein podría haber previsto en 1905 el resultado de su famoso artículo. Es absurdo siquiera plantearlo.

Ya famoso, Einstein huyó del nazismo y se refugió en EEUU. Allí, firmó una carta de varios académicos dirigida al entonces presidente Franklin D. Roosevelt, alertándolo sobre una posible bomba atómica nazi. Los que atribuyen responsabilidad moral a Einstein por haber firmado esa carta ¿qué hubieran hecho? Era un ser humano, con miedos y dudas. Conocía a Werner Heisenberg que dirigía el programa nuclear alemán, y que no era ningún estúpido. Si los nazis obtenían la bomba, hubieran dominado el mundo. Y aún así dudó, y tuvo que ser convencido por sus colegas para apoyar esa carta.

Son moralmente mucho más ambiguos Julius Oppenheimer o Enrico Fermi, quienes trabajaron directamente en el desarrollo del arma. E incluso así, no tanto: cuando la bomba se ensayó en Alamogordo, New Mexico, varios miembros del Proyecto Manhattan firmaron otra carta, pidiéndole al presidente Harry Truman que no la usara. Sugerían alertar al alto mando japonés de un ensayo en una isla del pacífico, para que pudieran verla, y así forzarlos a la rendición. Pero claro, a esa altura el objetivo de destruir Hiroshima no era detener a los japoneses ni a los nazis, sino asustar a los rusos. La decisión de arrojar la bomba fue una decisión política, y la responsabilidad les cabe a los políticos. No a Einsten ni a la ciencia.



(CC BY-SA 2.0, by romana klee)

Como conclusión: es ya hora de abandonar el negacionismo científico y el relativismo epistémico, porque no debilitan al poder, sino a los sectores populares que deben enfretarlo.

#spanish #español #ciencia #science #opinión #ensayo #política #politics




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#Guardian #Opinion #Election19 #UK
 
Please repeat after me:
"People who understand and are well informed about a subject usually have a different opinion on that subject than I do.
What does that say about my opinions?"




#opinion #understanding #well-informed #think
 
Please repeat after me:
"People who understand and are well informed about a subject usually have a different opinion on that subject than I do.
What does that say about my opinions?"




#opinion #understanding #well-informed #think
 

These brutal cuts to the #NHS will haunt the #Conservatives | Polly Toynbee | #Opinion | The Guardian


https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/25/boris-johnson-conservatives-nhs-funding

#UK #Politics #Tories
 

These brutal cuts to the #NHS will haunt the #Conservatives | Polly Toynbee | #Opinion | The Guardian


https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/25/boris-johnson-conservatives-nhs-funding

#UK #Politics #Tories
 

I work on #OperationYellowhammer. We all know what we’re doing is for show | The civil servant | #Opinion | The Guardian


An anonymous civil servant speaks out about #Brexit preparations.
 

I work on #OperationYellowhammer. We all know what we’re doing is for show | The civil servant | #Opinion | The Guardian


An anonymous civil servant speaks out about #Brexit preparations.
 
Today's #unpopular #opinion:

#Attribution is overrated


What I agree with about attribution:
- It shouldn't be lied about who the author of the work is, in the same way in which lying about anything is bad.
- In the current economical framework, requirement of attribution is a little more justified for free as in freedom works, as an alternative reward for direct money. BUT by requiring an attribution, the artist is still dealing with #business -- they're buying an ad, just not with money, but with time invested in creating the ad. In this sense I find such works not purely independently created #art, but largely a product of the #market.
- Asking for attribution is totally okay as long as it is not a legal requirement of the license.
- It is a good habit to attribute works that you extensively reused if it is not a big hassle, no matter the license conditions. I always try to do this.

The main points why I think it's overrated and why everything should be public domain ( #CC0 ):
  • The fact that attribution is not required legally doesn't mean it won't be attributed. In fact most people naturally do this, even with #publicdomain works. It is not like people are waiting for an opportunity to use a work without giving credit, there is no gain to such behavior. Not even in the commercial world!
  • The idea of "everything has to be owned by someone" is a product of the """intellectual property""" #propaganda, and leaks to the #freeculture world. The #copyright cancer makes us believe we own any piece of fart (#pun intended) we involuntarily produce in order to participate in a lottery of "this can go viral and you can become rich just by chance". That makes us believe we have to sign under everything just in case. In fact, as #freeculture argues, this copyright lottery has a lot of very wrong side effect that make the net result negative. Let's not support this.
  • One the side effects is that a required attribution creates real problems in practice. Creating a work based on many other works (personal experience: a Minetest texture pack) adds a lot of hassle, and requires the artist to keep a mile long list of every small work they used for any brush and small chunks of pixels or audio samples, with proper attribution format each individual artist requires. That is discouraging to creating new art and takes a bit of the precious energy of the artist away, making them not be able to fully concentrate on the art. A small mistake in such list makes you infringe on copyright as if you simply """pirated""" the work. For this reason, I personally filter out all free content that is not in public domain when creating derivative works -- so if you create an amazing work but license it CC-BY, I won't ever even see it.
  • If the work is really great and does go viral, the original author will absolutely most certainly be found and credited even without an attribution requirement. Why? Simply because people are curious and do want to support that person to create more such work. It is society's interest to find the true author in order to make them create more great work. The fact that authorship can be stolen changes nothing about the requirement of attribution -- it can be stolen either way (and that is wrong).
  • Love for creating art is a prerequisite for being an artist, and so the creative process is always a reward in itself. The net gain of creating art is therefore always positive for the artist, unlike as for example a factory worker, who hates their #job and has to be compensated with #money for doing it. The artist should require no compensation, which the attribution (an ad) represents. The fact that no one pays artists unless they fight for money is just a fault of #capitalism. So the attribution requirement may be a necessity at this specific moment, but we should admit that it is a hotfix of a faulty system and this should be eliminated eventually.
  • Requiring attribution is saying I need attention. If you want attention, don't do art (in a broad sense, such as programming, math, ...). Start a food blog at #instagram.
So please, dear #freeculture friend, next time you #share your work, please consider the #CC0 option, as I do :-)
 
Today's #unpopular #opinion:

#Attribution is overrated


What I agree with about attribution:
- It shouldn't be lied about who the author of the work is, in the same way in which lying about anything is bad.
- In the current economical framework, requirement of attribution is a little more justified for free as in freedom works, as an alternative reward for direct money. BUT by requiring an attribution, the artist is still dealing with #business -- they're buying an ad, just not with money, but with time invested in creating the ad. In this sense I find such works not purely independently created #art, but largely a product of the #market.
- Asking for attribution is totally okay as long as it is not a legal requirement of the license.
- It is a good habit to attribute works that you extensively reused if it is not a big hassle, no matter the license conditions. I always try to do this.

The main points why I think it's overrated and why everything should be public domain ( #CC0 ):
  • The fact that attribution is not required legally doesn't mean it won't be attributed. In fact most people naturally do this, even with #publicdomain works. It is not like people are waiting for an opportunity to use a work without giving credit, there is no gain to such behavior. Not even in the commercial world!
  • The idea of "everything has to be owned by someone" is a product of the """intellectual property""" #propaganda, and leaks to the #freeculture world. The #copyright cancer makes us believe we own any piece of fart (#pun intended) we involuntarily produce in order to participate in a lottery of "this can go viral and you can become rich just by chance". That makes us believe we have to sign under everything just in case. In fact, as #freeculture argues, this copyright lottery has a lot of very wrong side effect that make the net result negative. Let's not support this.
  • One the side effects is that a required attribution creates real problems in practice. Creating a work based on many other works (personal experience: a Minetest texture pack) adds a lot of hassle, and requires the artist to keep a mile long list of every small work they used for any brush and small chunks of pixels or audio samples, with proper attribution format each individual artist requires. That is discouraging to creating new art and takes a bit of the precious energy of the artist away, making them not be able to fully concentrate on the art. A small mistake in such list makes you infringe on copyright as if you simply """pirated""" the work. For this reason, I personally filter out all free content that is not in public domain when creating derivative works -- so if you create an amazing work but license it CC-BY, I won't ever even see it.
  • If the work is really great and does go viral, the original author will absolutely most certainly be found and credited even without an attribution requirement. Why? Simply because people are curious and do want to support that person to create more such work. It is society's interest to find the true author in order to make them create more great work. The fact that authorship can be stolen changes nothing about the requirement of attribution -- it can be stolen either way (and that is wrong).
  • Love for creating art is a prerequisite for being an artist, and so the creative process is always a reward in itself. The net gain of creating art is therefore always positive for the artist, unlike as for example a factory worker, who hates their #job and has to be compensated with #money for doing it. The artist should require no compensation, which the attribution (an ad) represents. The fact that no one pays artists unless they fight for money is just a fault of #capitalism. So the attribution requirement may be a necessity at this specific moment, but we should admit that it is a hotfix of a faulty system and this should be eliminated eventually.
  • Requiring attribution is saying I need attention. If you want attention, don't do art (in a broad sense, such as programming, math, ...). Start a food blog at #instagram.
So please, dear #freeculture friend, next time you #share your work, please consider the #CC0 option, as I do :-)
 
Is the population lulled into a false sense of security until it's too late? Nick Cohen seems to think so. I think he's partially right. I think whichever form of Brexit we are going to get at the end of March it won't be an immediate catastrophe. There will be some kind of muddling through and while there will be some issues life as we know it won't come to an end. The real impact will be longer term over the next one or two decades with companies and jobs gradually leaving the UK. Meaning the population will only realise the damage gradually and once it is too late.
A hidden government is preparing for Brexit… by keeping us in the dark | Nick Cohen | Opinion | The Guardian
#Brexit #UK #EU #politics #economy #opinion #preparation
 
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