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Bei uns ist der Schlittschuh-Drops ja schon gelutscht, aber #Apetor hat trotzdem noch ein paar gute Tipps parat:

https://youtu.be/INYuW-hW_nI
#Schlttschuh #Norway #safetyfirst
 
The common norwegian-swedish project on #wolves survey has been running for many years in the winter, when there is snow and it is easy to see wolfe traces. It will continue until March 31st, but a report for the first half of the winter has been published. There are almost 100 wolves in #Norway, some are in the border area with #Sweden, but most norwegian wolves are concentrated in two counties ("fylke") in southeast Norway where they are protected by wolfe zones. DNA-traces are used to avoid that the same specimen are counted several times. Link in norwegian language.
 
That's a pretty cool story!
Ursprünglich geteilt von @Andrea Borgia

Thread by @robbie_andrew on Thread Reader App – Thread Reader App



https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1347866969521983490.html

A weird story from #norway and of course there’s #aha in it :)
 

Thread by @robbie_andrew on Thread Reader App – Thread Reader App


https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1347866969521983490.html

A weird story from #norway and of course there's #aha in it :)
 
Heute viel Strecke gemacht in #Norway. Drei Fähren, ein Dutzend Tunnel und vierzig Berge später endlich an einem kleinen Campingplatz in der Nähe von Molde angekommen.
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Dafür (s. last Toot) sieht’s hier ganz annehmbar aus. Bevor ich geschlagen würde, tät ich hier wohl wohnen können... #norway
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Welcome to #Norway

A #dailyPhoto taken recently during a trip to #Saltdal, #Nordland, here in Norway. A #farm house painted with the typical Norwegian red paint can be seen in the background: https://mastodon.social/media/2CwhpxX5Hrk0rP0Aoa4

If you want to learn a bit more about why the #paint so often is red, you might like this article former #GooglePlus chief architect #YonatanZunger once wrote about that: https://plus.google.com/+YonatanZunger/posts/EfmdR6VWvRM" target="_blank">https://web.archive.org/web/20180116213841/https://plus.google.com/+YonatanZunger/posts/EfmdR6VWvRM

#landscapePhotography #ruralPhotography #landscapes
Bild/Foto
 

Mika McKinnon auf Twitter: "Q: Whoa. What’s happening?! A: This is a quickclay landslide. Everyone is ok, even the dog. The science is spectacular in an unnerving sort of way." / Twitter


Heftigerr Scheiß. das Video ist echt krass.

#Norway #Landslide
 

Edvard Grieg


Bild/Foto

My eldest daughter likes mint tea because that was served in the after school care when she was little. The taste of remembrance. I feel the same way about the Norwegian composer Edward Grieg's piano concerto in a-minor. It is the sound of a time that is long gone, of people who are not here any more.

And it has to be the version with Sviatoslav Richter and the Monte-Carlo orchestra.

#music #classic #EdvardGrieg #Grieg #SviatoslavRichter #Richter #Monte-Carlo #remembrance #Norway #Norwegian #1975
 

Edvard Grieg


Bild/Foto

My eldest daughter likes mint tea because that was served in the after school care when she was little. The taste of remembrance. I feel the same way about the Norwegian composer Edward Grieg's piano concerto in a-minor. It is the sound of a time that is long gone, of people who are not here any more.

And it has to be the version with Sviatoslav Richter and the Monte-Carlo orchestra.

#music #classic #EdvardGrieg #Grieg #SviatoslavRichter #Richter #Monte-Carlo #remembrance #Norway #Norwegian #1975
 
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Norway Is Closed: PM Takes Drastic Measures to Stop Coronavirus


The Norwegian Prime Minister announced the most drastic set of measures ever seen outside of wartime in an attempt to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Millions of Norwegians and foreigners living in or visiting Norway will be impacted by a drastic set of measures announced by Erna Solberg today. Norway is essentially shutting itself down for two weeks, in a bid to stop the rapid spread of the coronavirus and COVID-19 disease.

https://www.lifeinnorway.net/norway-is-closed-coronavirus/

#Norway #COVID19 #Coronavirus #CoronavirusOutbreak #PublicHealth #PublicSafety #pandemic #epidemic #NotTheFlu #lockdown #quarantine #medical #HealthCare
 
Bild/Foto

Norway Is Closed: PM Takes Drastic Measures to Stop Coronavirus


The Norwegian Prime Minister announced the most drastic set of measures ever seen outside of wartime in an attempt to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Millions of Norwegians and foreigners living in or visiting Norway will be impacted by a drastic set of measures announced by Erna Solberg today. Norway is essentially shutting itself down for two weeks, in a bid to stop the rapid spread of the coronavirus and COVID-19 disease.

https://www.lifeinnorway.net/norway-is-closed-coronavirus/

#Norway #COVID19 #Coronavirus #CoronavirusOutbreak #PublicHealth #PublicSafety #pandemic #epidemic #NotTheFlu #lockdown #quarantine #medical #HealthCare
 

Norwegian Forest Cats: The Pets of the Vikings


Badass #cats #caturday
#Vikings #Norway
Norwegian Forest Cats: The Pets of the Vikings
 
Daß Leo Norweger ist - ich hab' den immer für einen US-Amerikaner gehalten, warum eigentlich?
Und das ist natürlich die beste Verkaufsannonce ever!
Ursprünglich geteilt von @Christian M. Grube

. Our house for sale 😀 #metal #norway

 

Do you know what happened to #Norway last night?


source: https://www.nrk.no/chasing-climate-change-1.14859595

norway

#climate #environment #news
 
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What cause would you break the law for?—and risk punishment?

Are there situations where you feel you have a moral obligation to break the law? Is there something you think is so wrong that you are willing to break the law to stop it?
#disobeyatthemuseum #Alta #Norway #disobedience #AltaMuseum
 
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What cause would you break the law for?—and risk punishment?

Are there situations where you feel you have a moral obligation to break the law? Is there something you think is so wrong that you are willing to break the law to stop it?
#disobeyatthemuseum #Alta #Norway #disobedience #AltaMuseum
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #åland, #culture, #danmark, #denmark, #ecolab, #ecolife, #ecology, #færoyar, #færøyene, #faroeislands, #finland, #humanities, #iceland, #island, #nature, #noreg, #norge, #norway, #science, #suomi, #sverige, and #sweden. And a lot more. And more will come :D

And I'm sorry - this page is for a busnees - see lsxs.no. But I won't do commercials in here. This will be my alternative to other more populated communities. Based in Oslo, Norway I move around in Scandinavia / the nordic countries a lot.
 
#Norge #Norway #Norwegen #antifa

Norwegian journalism project "Filter Nyheter" has brought a new homepage regarding far right extremists online. With newsletter.
Forside
 
I was there during my holidays last year and saw it. It's really a cool idea, but also dangerous if you're drunk...

#Norway
Ursprünglich geteilt von @Stuart Richman

TRONDHEIM, NORWAY
Trondheim CycloCable
The world’s first and only escalator for lazy bicycles and their daunted riders

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/trondheim-cyclocable
 
Bild/Foto

Remembering Utøya massacre today! On July 22, 2011, A christian white supremacist executed 69 people including 33 children. ❤️❤️❤️NEVER FORGET


#politics #history #terrorism #Utøya #Norway #WhiteTerrorism #NaziTerror
 
Bild/Foto

Remembering Utøya massacre today! On July 22, 2011, A christian white supremacist executed 69 people including 33 children. ❤️❤️❤️NEVER FORGET


#politics #history #terrorism #Utøya #Norway #WhiteTerrorism #NaziTerror
 


“Under” – Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant

Europe’s first underwater restaurant will welcome guests in Lindesnes, Norway on March 20th, 2019. Located at the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline, where the sea storms from the north and south meet, the project is situated at a unique confluence. Marine species flourish here in the both briny and brackish waters to produce a natural abundance in biodiversity at the site. The Snøhetta-designed restaurant also functions as a research center for marine life, providing a tribute to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.




In Norwegian, “under” has the dual meaning of ”below” and ”wonder”. Half-sunken into the sea, the building’s 34-meter long monolithic form breaks the surface of the water to rest directly on the seabed five meters below. The structure is designed to fully integrate into its marine environment over time, as the roughness of the concrete shell will function as an artificial reef, welcoming limpets and kelp to inhabit it. With the thick concrete walls lying against the craggy shoreline, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive window offers a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.
#Norway #Lindesnes #Architecture #Landscape #Interior #Design #Culture #Restaurant
 


“Under” – Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant

Europe’s first underwater restaurant will welcome guests in Lindesnes, Norway on March 20th, 2019. Located at the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline, where the sea storms from the north and south meet, the project is situated at a unique confluence. Marine species flourish here in the both briny and brackish waters to produce a natural abundance in biodiversity at the site. The Snøhetta-designed restaurant also functions as a research center for marine life, providing a tribute to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.




In Norwegian, “under” has the dual meaning of ”below” and ”wonder”. Half-sunken into the sea, the building’s 34-meter long monolithic form breaks the surface of the water to rest directly on the seabed five meters below. The structure is designed to fully integrate into its marine environment over time, as the roughness of the concrete shell will function as an artificial reef, welcoming limpets and kelp to inhabit it. With the thick concrete walls lying against the craggy shoreline, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive window offers a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.
#Norway #Lindesnes #Architecture #Landscape #Interior #Design #Culture #Restaurant
 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.
 
Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic? - How much Oil is in the Arctic/Northpole?


World Energy Outlook: Wohin geht die Reise der Preise?


„Although many hope that oil companies will drill for oil when prices go up and close the supply gap looming within the next few years, very little oil has been found to drill for for several years now.

The IEA 2018 report also says that shale oil will not rescue us, and likely to peak in the mid-2020s.“

src: energyskeptic.com

D.h. nach diesen Angaben muss die Welt davon ausgehen, dass die US-Fracking-Blase c.a. 2025 „platzt“ d.h. dann wird es mit dem „Fracking-Wunder“ in Nordamerika vorbei sein, d.h. der Öl-Output nachgeben.

Auch der Nordpol wird uns (vermutlich) nicht retten weil:
  • Hoher Förderaufwand
  • weniger Öl als Venezuela
s.h. dazu weiter unten mehr.

Gehen wir von 2030 aus, d.h. in bis in 10 Jahren, könnte der Ölpreis massiv ansteigen, darauf sollte man sich vorbereiten.

D.h. die Welt hat noch 10 Jahre Zeit um Alternativen zu entwickeln, was ich besonders verheerend Finde, dass die, die das große Geschäfft machen zum Teil relativ wenig in den Ausbau von Alternativen investieren.

Es kann sein, dass dann um bestehende „alte“ Ölquellen welche ihren Peak schon lange hinter sich haben, „nachgefrackt“ wird und dann kann man noch weitere 5 Jahre bis 2035 „so weiter machen“.

Danach wird aber der Kampf um die verbleibenden letzten Ölblasen noch heftiger und der Preis vermutlich sogar über 2€ und mehr der Liter Benzin/Diesel steigen.

Die Ölreserven von Saudi Arabien könnten schon recht bald zum Ende kommen (es wird vermutlich um bestehenden Erdöl-Felder „nachgefrackt“) Venezuela hat noch Öl, weil deren Ölfördermenge relativ gering war, ist man dort an einem direkten Zugriff und einer entsprechenden Steigerung der Fördermengen interessiert.

Wie lange die Ölvorräte halten werden ist nicht bekannt und muss ständig neu berechnet werden, bekannt ist nur, dass immer schneller gefrackt und neue Mini-Ölfunde gefunden und erschlossen werden müssen um den globalen Förderoutput zu halten.

Ein zweites Saudi Arabien ist aktuell NICHT in Sicht.

Definitiv nicht nachhaltig, aber wenn es ganz Markt-Ökonomisch sieht wird es mit dem Erdöl noch 10-20 Jahre „noch gehen“, aber mit immer mehr Input für immer weniger Output, d.h. der Aufwand die Fördermenge oben zu halten steigt jetzt schon.

Die massive Trendwende bei den Erneuerbaren wird vermutlich c.a. 2040 kommen, wenn uns bis dahin der Sturm des Klimawandels nicht schon weggefegt hat.

Es ist also alles sehr langfristig zu sehen.

D.h. das Timing ist wichtig, weil ob sich Solar, Batterien und Elektromobilität rechnet oder nicht, hängt einfach massiv vom Ölpreis ab.

„The 2010s oil glut is a considerable surplus of crude oil that started in 2014–2015 and accelerated in 2016, with multiple causes. They include general oversupply as US and Canadian tight oil (shale oil) production reached critical volumes, geopolitical rivalries amongst oil-producing nations, falling demand across commodities markets due to the deceleration of the Chinese economy, and possible restraint of long-term demand as Environmental policy promotes fuel efficiency and steers an increasing share of energy consumption away from fossil fuels. “

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010s_oil_glut

Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic?


(Internet available Data in 2019-01)

Natürlich weiß wiedermal keiner genaue Zahlen, aber eine Schätzung der U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2008 geht von Energie „im Wert“ von 240 Milliarden Barrels Öl am Nordpol/Arctic aus.

Das sind weniger als die in 2019 vermuteten Öl-Reserven von Venezuela.

„240 billion proven barrels of oil“ (mit „Billionen“ meinen die Amis „Milliarden“)

= 240.000.000.000 Barrels

http://large.stanford.edu/courses/2015/ph240/urban2/

Zum Vergleich: Venezuela hat 300,878 proven reserves (millions of barrels)

= 300.878.000.000 Barrels

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_proven_oil_reserves

Der Welt-Öl-Bedarf war 2015: 93 Millionen Barrel Öl pro Tag.

„The total worldwide oil consumption was 93 million barrels per day (bbl/day) on average in 2015 according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).[3]“ (Quelle: wikipedia.org)

D.h. allein die geschätzten Vorräte des Nordpols würden der 2015er Verbrauchs-Welt 240.000.000.000/93.000.000 = 2580 Tage / 365 = 7 Jahre reichen.

die von Venezuela: 300878000000/93000000 = 3235Tage / 365 = 8 Jahre.

D.h. das „Ende“ ist absehbar und man sollte schon heute langsam aber sicher gegensteuern.

Videos:



Links:


https://generation-nachhaltigkeit.de/peakoil-within-reach/

\#sustainability #nachhaltigkeit #arctic #northpole #nordpol #bigoil #energy #fracking #shale #russia #usa #norway #energie #oil #fossil #fuel #alternatives #benzin #diesel #transport #logistik
Quelle: https://generation-nachhaltigkeit.de/wie-viel-erdoel-gibt-es-am-nordpol-arctic-how-much-oil-is-in-the-arctic-northpole/
Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic? – How much Oil is in the Arctic/Northpole?
 
Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic? - How much Oil is in the Arctic/Northpole?


World Energy Outlook: Wohin geht die Reise der Preise?


„Although many hope that oil companies will drill for oil when prices go up and close the supply gap looming within the next few years, very little oil has been found to drill for for several years now.

The IEA 2018 report also says that shale oil will not rescue us, and likely to peak in the mid-2020s.“

src: energyskeptic.com

D.h. nach diesen Angaben muss die Welt davon ausgehen, dass die US-Fracking-Blase c.a. 2025 „platzt“ d.h. dann wird es mit dem „Fracking-Wunder“ in Nordamerika vorbei sein, d.h. der Öl-Output nachgeben.

Auch der Nordpol wird uns (vermutlich) nicht retten weil:
  • Hoher Förderaufwand
  • weniger Öl als Venezuela
s.h. dazu weiter unten mehr.

Gehen wir von 2030 aus, d.h. in bis in 10 Jahren, könnte der Ölpreis massiv ansteigen, darauf sollte man sich vorbereiten.

D.h. die Welt hat noch 10 Jahre Zeit um Alternativen zu entwickeln, was ich besonders verheerend Finde, dass die, die das große Geschäfft machen zum Teil relativ wenig in den Ausbau von Alternativen investieren.

Es kann sein, dass dann um bestehende „alte“ Ölquellen welche ihren Peak schon lange hinter sich haben, „nachgefrackt“ wird und dann kann man noch weitere 5 Jahre bis 2035 „so weiter machen“.

Danach wird aber der Kampf um die verbleibenden letzten Ölblasen noch heftiger und der Preis vermutlich sogar über 2€ und mehr der Liter Benzin/Diesel steigen.

Die Ölreserven von Saudi Arabien könnten schon recht bald zum Ende kommen (es wird vermutlich um bestehenden Erdöl-Felder „nachgefrackt“) Venezuela hat noch Öl, weil deren Ölfördermenge relativ gering war, ist man dort an einem direkten Zugriff und einer entsprechenden Steigerung der Fördermengen interessiert.

Wie lange die Ölvorräte halten werden ist nicht bekannt und muss ständig neu berechnet werden, bekannt ist nur, dass immer schneller gefrackt und neue Mini-Ölfunde gefunden und erschlossen werden müssen um den globalen Förderoutput zu halten.

Ein zweites Saudi Arabien ist aktuell NICHT in Sicht.

Definitiv nicht nachhaltig, aber wenn es ganz Markt-Ökonomisch sieht wird es mit dem Erdöl noch 10-20 Jahre „noch gehen“, aber mit immer mehr Input für immer weniger Output, d.h. der Aufwand die Fördermenge oben zu halten steigt jetzt schon.

Die massive Trendwende bei den Erneuerbaren wird vermutlich c.a. 2040 kommen, wenn uns bis dahin der Sturm des Klimawandels nicht schon weggefegt hat.

Es ist also alles sehr langfristig zu sehen.

D.h. das Timing ist wichtig, weil ob sich Solar, Batterien und Elektromobilität rechnet oder nicht, hängt einfach massiv vom Ölpreis ab.

„The 2010s oil glut is a considerable surplus of crude oil that started in 2014–2015 and accelerated in 2016, with multiple causes. They include general oversupply as US and Canadian tight oil (shale oil) production reached critical volumes, geopolitical rivalries amongst oil-producing nations, falling demand across commodities markets due to the deceleration of the Chinese economy, and possible restraint of long-term demand as Environmental policy promotes fuel efficiency and steers an increasing share of energy consumption away from fossil fuels. “

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010s_oil_glut

Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic?


(Internet available Data in 2019-01)

Natürlich weiß wiedermal keiner genaue Zahlen, aber eine Schätzung der U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2008 geht von Energie „im Wert“ von 240 Milliarden Barrels Öl am Nordpol/Arctic aus.

Das sind weniger als die in 2019 vermuteten Öl-Reserven von Venezuela.

„240 billion proven barrels of oil“ (mit „Billionen“ meinen die Amis „Milliarden“)

= 240.000.000.000 Barrels

http://large.stanford.edu/courses/2015/ph240/urban2/

Zum Vergleich: Venezuela hat 300,878 proven reserves (millions of barrels)

= 300.878.000.000 Barrels

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_proven_oil_reserves

Der Welt-Öl-Bedarf war 2015: 93 Millionen Barrel Öl pro Tag.

„The total worldwide oil consumption was 93 million barrels per day (bbl/day) on average in 2015 according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).[3]“ (Quelle: wikipedia.org)

D.h. allein die geschätzten Vorräte des Nordpols würden der 2015er Verbrauchs-Welt 240.000.000.000/93.000.000 = 2580 Tage / 365 = 7 Jahre reichen.

die von Venezuela: 300878000000/93000000 = 3235Tage / 365 = 8 Jahre.

D.h. das „Ende“ ist absehbar und man sollte schon heute langsam aber sicher gegensteuern.

Videos:



Links:


https://generation-nachhaltigkeit.de/peakoil-within-reach/

\#sustainability #nachhaltigkeit #arctic #northpole #nordpol #bigoil #energy #fracking #shale #russia #usa #norway #energie #oil #fossil #fuel #alternatives #benzin #diesel #transport #logistik
Quelle: https://generation-nachhaltigkeit.de/wie-viel-erdoel-gibt-es-am-nordpol-arctic-how-much-oil-is-in-the-arctic-northpole/
Wie viel Erdöl gibt es am Nordpol/Arctic? – How much Oil is in the Arctic/Northpole?
 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.
 

Norway's Insanely Efficient Scheme Recycles 97% of All Plastic Bottles They Use


When it comes to #recycling #plastic waste, #Norway is ahead the pack. In fact, the Scandinavian nation has virtually lapped the rest of the world.

Through an organisation called #Infinitum, Norway has created one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly ways of recycling plastic bottles, and the results are so impressive that many nations are following suit.

According to The Guardian, the scheme has allowed Norway to recycle 97 percent of all its plastic bottles, with less than one percent ending up in the #environment.

What's more, 92 percent of the bottles recycled yield such high quality material, it can be used again in drink bottles. In some cases, the system has already reused the same material more than 50 times.

That's a remarkable achievement, especially considering that worldwide, 91 percent of plastic produced isn't recycled, and 8 million metric tons end up in the ocean every year. In the US, the recycling rate for plastic bottles is around 30 percent. In the United Kingdom, it's somewhere between 20 and 45 percent.

So what is Norway doing differently? To put it simply, the nation has given recycling a value it didn't once have.

Today, it's often cheaper to create new plastic than it is to recycle old plastic, so without a financial incentive, why would companies and consumers bother to do the right thing for the environment?

The answer is, of course, money. Norway's model is based on a loan scheme, which means when a consumer buys a plastic bottle, they are charged a small additional fee equivalent to about 13 to 30 US cents.

This fee can then be redeemed in a number of ways. Consumers can either take it to a 'reverse vending machine' which returns the money after scanning the barcode of the deposited bottle, or they can return it to various small shops and gas stations for cash or store credit.

These shop owners also receive a small fee for each bottle they recycle, and some argue it has even increased their business.

"We want to get to the point where people realise they are buying the product but just borrowing the packaging," Kjell Olav Maldum, the CEO of Infinitum, told The Guardian.

But it's not just consumers that the government is targeting. At the same time, the country has also put an environmental tax on plastic producers - one that can be reduced with greater improvement.

If recycling is above 95 percent nationwide, then every producer, no matter what, is exempt from the tax. And while this may sound like a difficult target to meet, it has been reached every year for the past seven years.

Since the advent of this unique scheme, according to the company, Infinitum has been visited by representatives from many countries - including Scotland, India, China, Australia and others - all of whom are interested in following the nation's lead.

Germany and Lithuania are some of the only countries that can compete with Norway, and they both use similar systems.

Nevertheless, even in Norway, there's still room for improvement. This year, Infinitum estimates that 150,000 bottles will not be returned, and if they had, it would have saved enough energy to power 5,600 households for the year.

That's a pretty good reason to recycle.
 
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