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Stop using single use plastics!
Shoppers worldwide are using approximately 500 billion plastic bags a year. That's a 150 bags a year for every person on earth. Over 100,000 marine creatures and over 1 million sea birds die because of plastic yearly. If you conscioulsy use plastic without trying to switch to eco-friendly resources you are responsible for marine life deaths.
#marinelife #plastic #plasticbag #seabird #environment #environmentalist #earthday #earth #ecosia #sustainable #zerowaste #climatechange #globalwarming #extinctionrebellion #fridaysforfuture #plasticfree #saveourplanet #vegan #renewable

 
Bild/Foto

Stop using single use plastics!
Shoppers worldwide are using approximately 500 billion plastic bags a year. That's a 150 bags a year for every person on earth. Over 100,000 marine creatures and over 1 million sea birds die because of plastic yearly. If you conscioulsy use plastic without trying to switch to eco-friendly resources you are responsible for marine life deaths.
#marinelife #plastic #plasticbag #seabird #environment #environmentalist #earthday #earth #ecosia #sustainable #zerowaste #climatechange #globalwarming #extinctionrebellion #fridaysforfuture #plasticfree #saveourplanet #vegan #renewable

 
#globalwarming #marinelife #naturalhabitats

"When it comes to global warming, there may no longer be plenty of fish in the sea: new research suggests that cold-blooded sealife may be twice as likely to be at risk in its natural habitat as land-dwelling ectotherms.

This finding is unexpected: the ocean is, in both area and volume, the single biggest living space on the planet. Fish that feel the heat can move towards the poles when temperatures get too high.

But when US researchers took a closer look at the data available on the thermal discomfort zones – those moments when cold-blooded creatures begin to overheat and need to find a safe, cool place in which to lie low – those spiders and lizards that survive in the tropics and temperate zones actually stand a better chance of finding somewhere to hide, and thus living through heatwaves, than their marine cousins.

“New conservation efforts will be needed if the ocean is going to continue supporting human well-being, nutrition and economic activity”

“We find that, globally, marine species are being eliminated from their habitats by warming temperatures twice as often as land species,” said Malin Pinsky, of Rutgers University in New Brunswick.

“The findings suggest that new conservation efforts will be needed if the ocean is going to continue supporting human well-being, nutrition and economic activity.”

He and colleagues report in the journal Nature that they searched the literature for detailed information on 400 species, and calculated the safe conditions for 88 marine and 294 land animals. They also identified the coolest temperatures available to each species during the hottest parts of the year".

Cold-blooded sealife runs double heat risk | Climate News Network #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
Cold-blooded sealife runs double heat risk

 
#globalwarming #marinelife #naturalhabitats

"When it comes to global warming, there may no longer be plenty of fish in the sea: new research suggests that cold-blooded sealife may be twice as likely to be at risk in its natural habitat as land-dwelling ectotherms.

This finding is unexpected: the ocean is, in both area and volume, the single biggest living space on the planet. Fish that feel the heat can move towards the poles when temperatures get too high.

But when US researchers took a closer look at the data available on the thermal discomfort zones – those moments when cold-blooded creatures begin to overheat and need to find a safe, cool place in which to lie low – those spiders and lizards that survive in the tropics and temperate zones actually stand a better chance of finding somewhere to hide, and thus living through heatwaves, than their marine cousins.

“New conservation efforts will be needed if the ocean is going to continue supporting human well-being, nutrition and economic activity”

“We find that, globally, marine species are being eliminated from their habitats by warming temperatures twice as often as land species,” said Malin Pinsky, of Rutgers University in New Brunswick.

“The findings suggest that new conservation efforts will be needed if the ocean is going to continue supporting human well-being, nutrition and economic activity.”

He and colleagues report in the journal Nature that they searched the literature for detailed information on 400 species, and calculated the safe conditions for 88 marine and 294 land animals. They also identified the coolest temperatures available to each species during the hottest parts of the year".

Cold-blooded sealife runs double heat risk | Climate News Network #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
Cold-blooded sealife runs double heat risk