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Your family is none of their business



  • Today’s children have the most complex digital footprint in human history, with their data being collected by private companies and governments alike.
  • The consequences on a child’s future revolve around one’s freedom to learn from mistakes, the reputation damage caused by past mistakes, and the traumatic effects of discriminatory algorithms.
Summer is that time of the year when parents get to spend more time with their children. Often enough, this also means children get to spend more time with electronic devices, their own or their parents’. Taking a selfie with the little one, or keeping them busy with a Facebook game or a Youtube animations playlist – these are examples that make the digital footprint of today’s child the largest in human history.

Who wants your child’s data?

https://edri.org/your-family-is-none-of-their-business/

Mobile phones, tablets and other electronic devices can open the door for the exploitation of the data about the person using that device – how old they are, what race they are, where are they located, what websites they visit etc. Often enough, that person is a child. But who would want a child’s data?

Companies that develop “smart” toys are the first example. In the past year, they’ve been in the spotlight for excessively collecting, storing and mis-handling minors’ data. Perhaps you still remember the notorious case of “My Friend Cayla”, the “smart” doll that was proved to record the conversations between it and children, and share them with advertisers. In fact, the doll was banned in Germany as an illegal “hidden espionage device”. However, the list of “smart” technologies collecting children data is long. Another example of a private company mistreating children’s data was the case of Google offering its school products to young American students and tracking them across their different (home) devices to train other Google products. A German DPA (Data Protection Authority) decided to ban Microsoft Office 365 from schools over privacy concerns.

Besides private companies, state authorities have an interest to record, store and use children’s online activity. For example, a Big Brother Watch 2018 report points that in the United Kingdom “Department for Education (DfE) demands a huge volume of data about individual children from state funded schools and nurseries, three times every year in the School Census, and other annual surveys.” Data collected by schools (child’s name, birth date, ethnicity, school performance, special educational needs and so on) is combined with social media profile or other data (e.g household data) bought from data brokers. Why linking all these records? Local authorities wish to focus more on training algorithms that predict children’s behaviour in order to identify “certain” children prone to gang affiliations or political radicalisation.

Consequences for a child’s future

Today’s children have the biggest digital footprint out of all humans in human history. Sometimes, the collection of a child’s data starts even before they are born, and this data will increasingly determine their future. What does this mean for kids’ development and their life choices?

The extensive data collection of today’s children aims at neutralising behavioural “errors” and optimising their performance. But mistakes are valuable during a child’s self-development – committing errors and learning lessons is an important complementary to receiving knowledge from adults. In fact, a recent psychology study shows that failure to provide an answer to a test is benefiting the learning process. Constantly using algorithms to optimise performance based on a child’s digital footprint will damage the child’s right to make and learn from mistakes.

https://invidio.us/watch?v=afYVNHDLTMc

#edri #kids #family #children #gafam #protection #privacy #collection #tracking
Your family is none of their business

 

Your family is none of their business



  • Today’s children have the most complex digital footprint in human history, with their data being collected by private companies and governments alike.
  • The consequences on a child’s future revolve around one’s freedom to learn from mistakes, the reputation damage caused by past mistakes, and the traumatic effects of discriminatory algorithms.
Summer is that time of the year when parents get to spend more time with their children. Often enough, this also means children get to spend more time with electronic devices, their own or their parents’. Taking a selfie with the little one, or keeping them busy with a Facebook game or a Youtube animations playlist – these are examples that make the digital footprint of today’s child the largest in human history.

Who wants your child’s data?

https://edri.org/your-family-is-none-of-their-business/

Mobile phones, tablets and other electronic devices can open the door for the exploitation of the data about the person using that device – how old they are, what race they are, where are they located, what websites they visit etc. Often enough, that person is a child. But who would want a child’s data?

Companies that develop “smart” toys are the first example. In the past year, they’ve been in the spotlight for excessively collecting, storing and mis-handling minors’ data. Perhaps you still remember the notorious case of “My Friend Cayla”, the “smart” doll that was proved to record the conversations between it and children, and share them with advertisers. In fact, the doll was banned in Germany as an illegal “hidden espionage device”. However, the list of “smart” technologies collecting children data is long. Another example of a private company mistreating children’s data was the case of Google offering its school products to young American students and tracking them across their different (home) devices to train other Google products. A German DPA (Data Protection Authority) decided to ban Microsoft Office 365 from schools over privacy concerns.

Besides private companies, state authorities have an interest to record, store and use children’s online activity. For example, a Big Brother Watch 2018 report points that in the United Kingdom “Department for Education (DfE) demands a huge volume of data about individual children from state funded schools and nurseries, three times every year in the School Census, and other annual surveys.” Data collected by schools (child’s name, birth date, ethnicity, school performance, special educational needs and so on) is combined with social media profile or other data (e.g household data) bought from data brokers. Why linking all these records? Local authorities wish to focus more on training algorithms that predict children’s behaviour in order to identify “certain” children prone to gang affiliations or political radicalisation.

Consequences for a child’s future

Today’s children have the biggest digital footprint out of all humans in human history. Sometimes, the collection of a child’s data starts even before they are born, and this data will increasingly determine their future. What does this mean for kids’ development and their life choices?

The extensive data collection of today’s children aims at neutralising behavioural “errors” and optimising their performance. But mistakes are valuable during a child’s self-development – committing errors and learning lessons is an important complementary to receiving knowledge from adults. In fact, a recent psychology study shows that failure to provide an answer to a test is benefiting the learning process. Constantly using algorithms to optimise performance based on a child’s digital footprint will damage the child’s right to make and learn from mistakes.

https://invidio.us/watch?v=afYVNHDLTMc

#edri #kids #family #children #gafam #protection #privacy #collection #tracking
Your family is none of their business

 

Lamb of God - Redneck (Explicit Video) - YouTube


Who says perfect children birthday parties don't exist?

#music #metal #birthday #party #children


 
Bild/Foto

True words: Twenty-five years ago people could be excused for not knowing much, or doing much, about climate change. Today we have no excuse. If you really think that the environment is less important than the economy, try holding your breath while you count your money. 🙏🏼🌍 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - #climatechange #demonstration #fridaysforfuture #climate #klima #klimawandel #education #plastic #nature #change #environment #animals #trump #arctic #climateaction #science #germany #help #children #educationforall #humanrights #security #health #paris

 
You can not raise your children...


#world #children

 

Expert Says Don’t Teach Kids to Code


I agree with the article. The OECD dude clearly has no clue what learning to code is about. It teaches you analytical and algorithmic thinking, problem solving, decomposition skills and so much more that will be useful even if you never write a line of code again afterwards.

The only thing in the article that I slightly disagree with is this bit:
But the real value is to understand when and why you would want, say, a linked list vs a hash table vs a binary tree data structure.
That's still waaaaay too low-level a skill to be generally useful. This might be useful later on for a couple of kids that become programmers. But as I said above, I believe that the skills you learn from programming go way beyond that on a much more abstract level (but learned on the very concrete level of coding) and benefit you even in the unlikely event that you never touch a computer again.

He makes up for it though with this very true bit:
This isn’t a new problem. Gifted math teachers or gifted math students build intuition about the universe by understanding what math means. Dull teachers and students just learn rote formulae and apply patterns to problems without real understanding.
I'm going to digress a bit here, but it's not just the "dull" part that's the problem in my opinion. The way courses and exams are set up today, we are actually selecting for formula grinding skills instead of true understanding.

When I was a RA/TA at university, I discussed this a couple of times with my Prof, and I stand by my opinion: grinding specific problem types and solution steps into students in lab courses, and then testing those exact same problems in the exam with the exact same steps, just with slightly different parameters, is not a proper way to test understanding, nor a particularly good way of teaching.

Instead, you should test for understanding by requiring them to apply the taught principles to new problems (and train that in the lab couses of course). This doesn't have to be a wildly different kind of problems, but at least enough that they have to think a little about which of the learned algorithms would apply and how. Problem with that: it requires more effort on both sides, grades will likely suffer, students grumble, and teachers get flak from students, possibly parents, and definitely their deans.

#children #coding #education #kids #school #stem #students #hackaday