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UK Sees Garden Gnome Shortage After Suez Canal Incident : NPR


@Jamie Macbeth Oh no! Better be quick!

#gardenGnomes #UK
 

Sewage island: how Britain spews its waste into the sea | Water | The Guardian


Anyone in desire for bathing?

#UK #sewage
 
New work AND a new place! This is Roundsea Mosses & Woods Nature Reserve in Cumbria.

A place of bog, woods, and sea. 👍

Loads more photos from this hike here, if you’re interested -> https://www.iancylkowski.com/blog/2021/4/17/roudsea-wood-mosses-cumbria-spring

#lansdcape #photography #photo #photographie #nature #travel #spring #cumbria #uk #britain #england
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Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
 
#UK #adequacy decisions
During its 48th plenary session, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) adopted two Opinions on the draft UK adequacy decisions
 
#scramcams #UK
UK rollout for sweat-testing ankle bands to enforce alcohol bans
 
#scramcams #UK
UK rollout for sweat-testing ankle bands to enforce alcohol bans
 

HRH Prince Philip Obituary






His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, who has died aged 99, was the longest serving royal consort in British history and did more than anyone besides the Queen to ensure the extraordinary success of her reign.

The first prince consort since Queen Victoria’s Albert (though the Duke of Edinburgh neither sought nor was granted that title), like his predecessor he overcame considerable difficulties and endured much criticism. Arguably, despite his prominence in public life for 70 years, he was the most misunderstood man of his generation.
https://cf.eip.telegraph.co.uk/store/img-media/9c65ce8b-13b4-41e4-a3e6-a897ae8648de/9c65ce8b-13b4-41e4-a3e6-a897ae8648de-original.jpg

#HRHPrincePhilip #DukeOfEdinburgh #Obituary #UK
 

HRH Prince Philip Obituary






His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, who has died aged 99, was the longest serving royal consort in British history and did more than anyone besides the Queen to ensure the extraordinary success of her reign.

The first prince consort since Queen Victoria’s Albert (though the Duke of Edinburgh neither sought nor was granted that title), like his predecessor he overcame considerable difficulties and endured much criticism. Arguably, despite his prominence in public life for 70 years, he was the most misunderstood man of his generation.
https://cf.eip.telegraph.co.uk/store/img-media/9c65ce8b-13b4-41e4-a3e6-a897ae8648de/9c65ce8b-13b4-41e4-a3e6-a897ae8648de-original.jpg

#HRHPrincePhilip #DukeOfEdinburgh #Obituary #UK
 

The Queen has lost her protector, but everything they built together lives on



In marrying for love, the Queen pulled off a rebellious feat for a monarch – and forged a terrific team that stood the test of time
Allison Pearson
9 April 2021 • 7:18pm
Allison Pearson

The Queen flashes a smile at Prince Philip, during the Trooping the Colour parade in 2009




If you surprised yourself by shedding a tear – as millions of us did – when you heard that Prince Philip was gone, no small part of that sadness will have been for his widow, our Queen and his beloved wife.

In 62 days, Her Majesty would have been able to send the Duke of Edinburgh a telegram for his 100th birthday. That would have amused them both. (They never stopped laughing together.) If he could possibly have hung on to give her that satisfaction, you just know that he would. For that was his job, always and until his final breath. He was her champion, “my strength and stay all these years,” the Queen called him on their Golden Wedding anniversary. Who will be there for her now he is gone?

Elizabeth and Philip, Philip and Elizabeth, their names and their destinies braided tightly together since their marriage 73 years ago in Westminster Abbey. The bride on that freezing November day appeared to be almost levitating with happiness, and no wonder.

The ridiculously handsome groom was an impecunious Greek prince (mainly Danish actually) out of a Hans Christian Andersen fairytale. Not for her some three-chinned Earl. Mrs Philip Mountbatten (as she would never be known) had pulled off one of the most daring feats ever observed in a constitutional monarchy. She had married for love.

Philip and Elizabeth, they must have thought they had 20 years to themselves, when they could raise a family and he could become Admiral on merit, before her father, King George, died and the door on the cage of Royal duty clanged shut. It was not to be.

Just four and a quarter years later, they were back in the Abbey for the Coronation and that restless, questing, charismatic man was kneeling before her, making a solemn promise: “I Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, do become your liegeman of life and limb and of earthly worship; and faith and truth I will bear unto you, to live and die against all manner of folks. So help me God.”

That was always the deal. To be her eyes and her ears, to speak truth unto Majesty. To not lie to her, nor fawn or flatter as others would. The Duke was the only one who dared shout at the Queen (she was known to yell back, particularly when he criticised her driving). Hers was the loneliest job in the world. Because she was a human to him before she plighted her troth to God, he made it less lonely.

All marriages are complicated. Philip and Elizabeth’s, it’s fair to say, was on another level. On Coronation Day, the flesh and blood woman he had taken for his wife was suddenly his anointed sovereign. A report in The Telegraph captured the metaphysical moment when the two roles – of husband and subject – became one: “She took his hand in hers before he drew back to touch the Crown and to kiss her on the left cheek.”

An impatient dynamo who passed out as best all-round cadet in his class at Dartmouth, Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten was destined to be a leader of men. From then on, he would follow a woman. It was a huge ask for an Alpha male of his generation. But if Elizabeth ruled the country, Philip’s word was law at home, even when she disagreed with him (about Prince Charles’s schooling to take one example).

So indispensable did he become to our national life that we now feel that, if there had never been a Duke of Edinburgh, it would have been necessary to invent him. It’s very easy to forget that, when he first came on the scene, Philip was considered a risk by a xenophobic Establishment. “Moustache types bristling away about ‘ghastly foreign fellows’, especially after the war,” as one courtier recalled.

But Lilibet loved him from the first time she saw him, when she was just 13 years old, and refused to consider more suitable candidates. You could say that he was her one act of rebellion, she his one act of conformity.
The Queen and Prince Philip in 2012
The Queen and Prince Philip in 2012 Credit: WireImage

Such different characters, they made a terrific team. As Sir John Colville, private secretary to Princess Elizabeth before she married, noted, “The Queen was frightfully good at knowing when to say ‘No’, though not so good at saying ‘Yes’. Philip on the other hand is good at ‘Yes’. Not the sort of yes-man who agrees with everyone else, but the sort of yes-man who will take a risk.” Today, the monarchy retains much of its pomp, but it had shed a lot of its pomposity thanks to a modernising Duke’s influence over his more traditionalist wife.

They were never openly romantic. Asked once to sign a copy of a mushy book about the Royal couple called Manifest Destiny, Philip crossed out the title and wrote “Manifest Bunkum”. Bunkum was a favourite word, so was travesty.

If they were not given to public displays of affection, the couple were bound together by the invaluable adhesive of humour. One of my favourite photographs shows the Queen, her head back and roaring with laughter in front of a Guardsman, his busby sunk low over his eyes. It was Philip, he was teasing her, and her whole face lit up as it had on that freezing November day seventy year before.

Elizabeth and Philip, like any long union, theirs had its secrets. In the late-Fifties, the Duke went on a voyage of self-discovery, leaving his wife at home for four months with the two children. For the prurient, the ten-year gap between the births of Charles and Anne and those of Andrew and Edward – two separate families almost – speaks of a possible drifting apart and eventual reconciliation. None of that matters today.

All the rumours and the gossip fall away and what remains is an enormous sense of gratitude for a magnificent marriage, a monument to patient and tender longevity. After seven often turbulent decades, the Queen and her handsome Prince were a sterling example of the unfashionable virtue of perseverance, of sticking to your vows.

It’s already been such a tough year for the Queen. A dark cloud of suspicion removed Prince Andrew from public life, then came the Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their petulant, cruelly-timed allegations of racism and insensitive treatment when Harry’s grandfather was ill. Throughout lockdown, Her Majesty has tried to keep the nations’ spirits up with stirring speeches (“We’ll meet again”) and Zoom calls. One consolation must have been that husband and wife were isolating together at Windsor, without the call of multiple engagements, ending married life as they began it all those years ago.

Prince Philip’s oldest friend, from his Navy days, recalled that “the Queen always came before everything else for him, how determined he was that everything he did should be for the benefit of his wife, both as a person and as Her Majesty”. Of all the many services the Duke performed for his country, that was the greatest. While he lived, we could take the monarch’s stability and contentment utterly for granted.

Now, at the age of 94, the Queen faces the future without her liegeman of life and limb, of faith and truth. The nation’s heart goes out to her. Her loss is our loss. When she grieves, we grieve.

Her family, particularly her heirs, Prince Charles, and Prince William, who is devoted to his grandmother, will rally round, but the Windsors, who have a tendency to keep their distance, need to draw much closer. Princess Anne, most like her father of all the children, will be a huge consolation and support to her mother.

Today, as we mourn a great and irreplaceable national character, we may half-fear that this is but a dress rehearsal for the sorrow we will feel when we lose our Queen. Not yet, please, not that, not yet. Her champion and protector is gone, but everything they built together lives on.

How blessed we were, Elizabeth and Philip.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/royal-family/2021/04/09/queen-has-lost-protector-everything-built-together-lives/
#PrincePhilip #DukeOfEdinburgh #UK #QueenElizabeth
 

The Queen has lost her protector, but everything they built together lives on



In marrying for love, the Queen pulled off a rebellious feat for a monarch – and forged a terrific team that stood the test of time
Allison Pearson
9 April 2021 • 7:18pm
Allison Pearson

The Queen flashes a smile at Prince Philip, during the Trooping the Colour parade in 2009




If you surprised yourself by shedding a tear – as millions of us did – when you heard that Prince Philip was gone, no small part of that sadness will have been for his widow, our Queen and his beloved wife.

In 62 days, Her Majesty would have been able to send the Duke of Edinburgh a telegram for his 100th birthday. That would have amused them both. (They never stopped laughing together.) If he could possibly have hung on to give her that satisfaction, you just know that he would. For that was his job, always and until his final breath. He was her champion, “my strength and stay all these years,” the Queen called him on their Golden Wedding anniversary. Who will be there for her now he is gone?

Elizabeth and Philip, Philip and Elizabeth, their names and their destinies braided tightly together since their marriage 73 years ago in Westminster Abbey. The bride on that freezing November day appeared to be almost levitating with happiness, and no wonder.

The ridiculously handsome groom was an impecunious Greek prince (mainly Danish actually) out of a Hans Christian Andersen fairytale. Not for her some three-chinned Earl. Mrs Philip Mountbatten (as she would never be known) had pulled off one of the most daring feats ever observed in a constitutional monarchy. She had married for love.

Philip and Elizabeth, they must have thought they had 20 years to themselves, when they could raise a family and he could become Admiral on merit, before her father, King George, died and the door on the cage of Royal duty clanged shut. It was not to be.

Just four and a quarter years later, they were back in the Abbey for the Coronation and that restless, questing, charismatic man was kneeling before her, making a solemn promise: “I Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, do become your liegeman of life and limb and of earthly worship; and faith and truth I will bear unto you, to live and die against all manner of folks. So help me God.”

That was always the deal. To be her eyes and her ears, to speak truth unto Majesty. To not lie to her, nor fawn or flatter as others would. The Duke was the only one who dared shout at the Queen (she was known to yell back, particularly when he criticised her driving). Hers was the loneliest job in the world. Because she was a human to him before she plighted her troth to God, he made it less lonely.

All marriages are complicated. Philip and Elizabeth’s, it’s fair to say, was on another level. On Coronation Day, the flesh and blood woman he had taken for his wife was suddenly his anointed sovereign. A report in The Telegraph captured the metaphysical moment when the two roles – of husband and subject – became one: “She took his hand in hers before he drew back to touch the Crown and to kiss her on the left cheek.”

An impatient dynamo who passed out as best all-round cadet in his class at Dartmouth, Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten was destined to be a leader of men. From then on, he would follow a woman. It was a huge ask for an Alpha male of his generation. But if Elizabeth ruled the country, Philip’s word was law at home, even when she disagreed with him (about Prince Charles’s schooling to take one example).

So indispensable did he become to our national life that we now feel that, if there had never been a Duke of Edinburgh, it would have been necessary to invent him. It’s very easy to forget that, when he first came on the scene, Philip was considered a risk by a xenophobic Establishment. “Moustache types bristling away about ‘ghastly foreign fellows’, especially after the war,” as one courtier recalled.

But Lilibet loved him from the first time she saw him, when she was just 13 years old, and refused to consider more suitable candidates. You could say that he was her one act of rebellion, she his one act of conformity.
The Queen and Prince Philip in 2012
The Queen and Prince Philip in 2012 Credit: WireImage

Such different characters, they made a terrific team. As Sir John Colville, private secretary to Princess Elizabeth before she married, noted, “The Queen was frightfully good at knowing when to say ‘No’, though not so good at saying ‘Yes’. Philip on the other hand is good at ‘Yes’. Not the sort of yes-man who agrees with everyone else, but the sort of yes-man who will take a risk.” Today, the monarchy retains much of its pomp, but it had shed a lot of its pomposity thanks to a modernising Duke’s influence over his more traditionalist wife.

They were never openly romantic. Asked once to sign a copy of a mushy book about the Royal couple called Manifest Destiny, Philip crossed out the title and wrote “Manifest Bunkum”. Bunkum was a favourite word, so was travesty.

If they were not given to public displays of affection, the couple were bound together by the invaluable adhesive of humour. One of my favourite photographs shows the Queen, her head back and roaring with laughter in front of a Guardsman, his busby sunk low over his eyes. It was Philip, he was teasing her, and her whole face lit up as it had on that freezing November day seventy year before.

Elizabeth and Philip, like any long union, theirs had its secrets. In the late-Fifties, the Duke went on a voyage of self-discovery, leaving his wife at home for four months with the two children. For the prurient, the ten-year gap between the births of Charles and Anne and those of Andrew and Edward – two separate families almost – speaks of a possible drifting apart and eventual reconciliation. None of that matters today.

All the rumours and the gossip fall away and what remains is an enormous sense of gratitude for a magnificent marriage, a monument to patient and tender longevity. After seven often turbulent decades, the Queen and her handsome Prince were a sterling example of the unfashionable virtue of perseverance, of sticking to your vows.

It’s already been such a tough year for the Queen. A dark cloud of suspicion removed Prince Andrew from public life, then came the Duke and Duchess of Sussex with their petulant, cruelly-timed allegations of racism and insensitive treatment when Harry’s grandfather was ill. Throughout lockdown, Her Majesty has tried to keep the nations’ spirits up with stirring speeches (“We’ll meet again”) and Zoom calls. One consolation must have been that husband and wife were isolating together at Windsor, without the call of multiple engagements, ending married life as they began it all those years ago.

Prince Philip’s oldest friend, from his Navy days, recalled that “the Queen always came before everything else for him, how determined he was that everything he did should be for the benefit of his wife, both as a person and as Her Majesty”. Of all the many services the Duke performed for his country, that was the greatest. While he lived, we could take the monarch’s stability and contentment utterly for granted.

Now, at the age of 94, the Queen faces the future without her liegeman of life and limb, of faith and truth. The nation’s heart goes out to her. Her loss is our loss. When she grieves, we grieve.

Her family, particularly her heirs, Prince Charles, and Prince William, who is devoted to his grandmother, will rally round, but the Windsors, who have a tendency to keep their distance, need to draw much closer. Princess Anne, most like her father of all the children, will be a huge consolation and support to her mother.

Today, as we mourn a great and irreplaceable national character, we may half-fear that this is but a dress rehearsal for the sorrow we will feel when we lose our Queen. Not yet, please, not that, not yet. Her champion and protector is gone, but everything they built together lives on.

How blessed we were, Elizabeth and Philip.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/royal-family/2021/04/09/queen-has-lost-protector-everything-built-together-lives/
#PrincePhilip #DukeOfEdinburgh #UK #QueenElizabeth
 
Not sure I follow this argument. When I submit my tax return my accountant (having lived/worked/inherited in two countries and having investments in two countries makes it a bit more complicated) asks me to confirm that my tax return is complete and correct to the best of my knowledge and makes very clear that it is ultimately my responsibility that it is correct and everything is declared.

So how does this guy get away with blaming the accountant for such blatant omissions? Surely he should have reviewed his return with his accountant and spotted these omissions?

Wealthy MP with slave trade links failed to publish accounts for four of his firms
Multimillionaire Tory Richard Drax blames accountant for more than a decade of missing records


#UK #politics #tax #taxreturn #accountant #blametheaccountant #tory #tories #RichardDrax
 
Not sure I follow this argument. When I submit my tax return my accountant (having lived/worked/inherited in two countries and having investments in two countries makes it a bit more complicated) asks me to confirm that my tax return is complete and correct to the best of my knowledge and makes very clear that it is ultimately my responsibility that it is correct and everything is declared.

So how does this guy get away with blaming the accountant for such blatant omissions? Surely he should have reviewed his return with his accountant and spotted these omissions?

Wealthy MP with slave trade links failed to publish accounts for four of his firms
Multimillionaire Tory Richard Drax blames accountant for more than a decade of missing records


#UK #politics #tax #taxreturn #accountant #blametheaccountant #tory #tories #RichardDrax
 

Capitalism won't save us from Covid, no matter what Boris Johnson might think


His claim that ‘greed’ was the driver behind the UK’s vaccine success ignores the huge role of state funding

Boris Johnson has attributed the UK’s vaccine success to “capitalism” and “greed”. Though these were crude remarks, if the prime minister’s words are any indication of his vision for how the UK can recover from the pandemic, there are worrying implications for the country’s policies at home and abroad.

This is not the first time that Johnson has taken the wrong economic lessons from the Covid crisis.

#UK #BorisJohnson #Greed #Covid-19
 

Capitalism won't save us from Covid, no matter what Boris Johnson might think


His claim that ‘greed’ was the driver behind the UK’s vaccine success ignores the huge role of state funding

Boris Johnson has attributed the UK’s vaccine success to “capitalism” and “greed”. Though these were crude remarks, if the prime minister’s words are any indication of his vision for how the UK can recover from the pandemic, there are worrying implications for the country’s policies at home and abroad.

This is not the first time that Johnson has taken the wrong economic lessons from the Covid crisis.

#UK #BorisJohnson #Greed #Covid-19
 
Bild/Foto

UK now has a new Flag law!


Heil the Fuhrer!

A successful distraction move by the British Trump to change the discussion subject and people's attention from his complete failure in handling the pandemic by ignoring it for months and putting business before safety and health of the nation, total and complete failure in Brexit negotiation and implementations, total and complete failure in handling the economy and an unbelievable criminal behavior in regards of refugees seeking asylum in the country.

#Politics #UK #Fascism #Idiocracy #fascism #Economy #Pandemic #Brexit
 
Bild/Foto

UK now has a new Flag law!


Heil the Fuhrer!

A successful distraction move by the British Trump to change the discussion subject and people's attention from his complete failure in handling the pandemic by ignoring it for months and putting business before safety and health of the nation, total and complete failure in Brexit negotiation and implementations, total and complete failure in handling the economy and an unbelievable criminal behavior in regards of refugees seeking asylum in the country.

#Politics #UK #Fascism #Idiocracy #fascism #Economy #Pandemic #Brexit
 
Oh yeah, the 20-22 are one of the noiser UK indie rock bands. This album though is part soft and in part waltz-y.


#music #indie #uk
 
Was hat die #EU bei der #Impfstoff Beschaffung falsch gemacht?

Antwort: Sie war zu naiv und #UK und #USA haben ihr die #Impfdosen weggeschnappt.

https://nitter.eu/DaveKeating/status/1372897635577761803
 
It’s thankfully started being brighter and dryer in the last few days, so we’ve been using the increasingly longer days to get some post-work wandering and photography done. 👍

There’s more from this hike here, if you’re interested -> https://www.iancylkowski.com/blog/2021/3/17/pandemic-peregrinations-serpentine-woods-spring-cumbria

#landscape #photo #photographie #photography #spring #cumbria #nature #travel #uk #britain #england
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Meteorite Older Than the Sun Found in a U.K. Driveway


Andrew Heinzman
@andrew_andrew__
Mar 13, 2021, 10:24 am EST | 1 min read
A photo of the rare meteorite that landed in a UK driveway.
Natural History Museum

There are two ways to get your hands on a meteorite. You can send up a billion-dollar robot to retrieve asteroid samples, or you can wait for a friendly space rock land at your doorstep for free. The latter option happened on February 28th, when a rare meteorite from the early solar system landed in a driveway in Winchcombe, England.

Scientists call this kind of meteorite “carbonaceous chondrite.” It contains a lot of carbon, so it looks a lot like coal, but carbonaceous chondrite actually dates back to the beginnings of our solar system and could help us understand Earth and other planets came to be. If this is like other samples of carbonaceous chondrite, it should also contain bits of diamond, graphite, and soft clay—a sign that the rock encountered water at some point.

Residents of Winchcombe, England, noticed a fireball reigning down before exploding in the sky the night of Sunday, February 28th. The next day, someone found the rock in their driveway, bagged it up, and contacted the U.K. Meteor Observation Network.

As noted by the Natural History Museum, the Winchcombe Meteorite is significantly larger than rocks collected by billion-dollar space probes. The Hayabusa2 probe returned to Earth last year with just 4.5 grams of asteroid rock, while the OSIRIS-REx probe is expected to return in 2023 with 60 grams of rock. But the Winchcombe Meteorite is 300 grams. Good things come to those who wait, I guess.
https://www.reviewgeek.com/73825/meteorite-older-than-the-sun-found-in-a-uk-driveway/

#Space #Meteorite #England #UK
 

Meteorite Older Than the Sun Found in a U.K. Driveway


Andrew Heinzman
@andrew_andrew__
Mar 13, 2021, 10:24 am EST | 1 min read
A photo of the rare meteorite that landed in a UK driveway.
Natural History Museum

There are two ways to get your hands on a meteorite. You can send up a billion-dollar robot to retrieve asteroid samples, or you can wait for a friendly space rock land at your doorstep for free. The latter option happened on February 28th, when a rare meteorite from the early solar system landed in a driveway in Winchcombe, England.

Scientists call this kind of meteorite “carbonaceous chondrite.” It contains a lot of carbon, so it looks a lot like coal, but carbonaceous chondrite actually dates back to the beginnings of our solar system and could help us understand Earth and other planets came to be. If this is like other samples of carbonaceous chondrite, it should also contain bits of diamond, graphite, and soft clay—a sign that the rock encountered water at some point.

Residents of Winchcombe, England, noticed a fireball reigning down before exploding in the sky the night of Sunday, February 28th. The next day, someone found the rock in their driveway, bagged it up, and contacted the U.K. Meteor Observation Network.

As noted by the Natural History Museum, the Winchcombe Meteorite is significantly larger than rocks collected by billion-dollar space probes. The Hayabusa2 probe returned to Earth last year with just 4.5 grams of asteroid rock, while the OSIRIS-REx probe is expected to return in 2023 with 60 grams of rock. But the Winchcombe Meteorite is 300 grams. Good things come to those who wait, I guess.
https://www.reviewgeek.com/73825/meteorite-older-than-the-sun-found-in-a-uk-driveway/

#Space #Meteorite #England #UK
 

Meteorite Older Than the Sun Found in a U.K. Driveway


Andrew Heinzman
@andrew_andrew__
Mar 13, 2021, 10:24 am EST | 1 min read
A photo of the rare meteorite that landed in a UK driveway.
Natural History Museum

There are two ways to get your hands on a meteorite. You can send up a billion-dollar robot to retrieve asteroid samples, or you can wait for a friendly space rock land at your doorstep for free. The latter option happened on February 28th, when a rare meteorite from the early solar system landed in a driveway in Winchcombe, England.

Scientists call this kind of meteorite “carbonaceous chondrite.” It contains a lot of carbon, so it looks a lot like coal, but carbonaceous chondrite actually dates back to the beginnings of our solar system and could help us understand Earth and other planets came to be. If this is like other samples of carbonaceous chondrite, it should also contain bits of diamond, graphite, and soft clay—a sign that the rock encountered water at some point.

Residents of Winchcombe, England, noticed a fireball reigning down before exploding in the sky the night of Sunday, February 28th. The next day, someone found the rock in their driveway, bagged it up, and contacted the U.K. Meteor Observation Network.

As noted by the Natural History Museum, the Winchcombe Meteorite is significantly larger than rocks collected by billion-dollar space probes. The Hayabusa2 probe returned to Earth last year with just 4.5 grams of asteroid rock, while the OSIRIS-REx probe is expected to return in 2023 with 60 grams of rock. But the Winchcombe Meteorite is 300 grams. Good things come to those who wait, I guess.
https://www.reviewgeek.com/73825/meteorite-older-than-the-sun-found-in-a-uk-driveway/

#Space #Meteorite #England #UK
 
Bild/Foto
This is bad news. https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/news/uk-to-depart-from-gdpr/5107685.article #UK government signals intention to depart from data protection laws brought in before #Brexit. #GDPR #EU #Privacy
 
Bild/Foto
This is bad news. https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/news/uk-to-depart-from-gdpr/5107685.article #UK government signals intention to depart from data protection laws brought in before #Brexit. #GDPR #EU #Privacy
 
Bild/Foto
This is bad news. https://www.lawgazette.co.uk/news/uk-to-depart-from-gdpr/5107685.article #UK government signals intention to depart from data protection laws brought in before #Brexit. #GDPR #EU #Privacy
 

The Brexiteer’s guide to #history


https://www.newstatesman.com/robert-tombs-this-sovereign-isle-review?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB

#UK #Brexit #EU #Europe
 

The Brexiteer’s guide to #history


https://www.newstatesman.com/robert-tombs-this-sovereign-isle-review?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB

#UK #Brexit #EU #Europe
 
Loyalists pen letter to #BorisJohnson withdrawing support for #GoodFridayAgreement

LOYALIST paramilitary organisations have penned a letter to #UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson withdrawing their support for the #Belfast Agreement – which has upheld peace in Northern #Ireland for two decades
 

UK: Muslim students demand apology for prof insulting Islam by saying insults to Islam are punishable by death


The Muslim students who are complaining and demanding an apology would be doing us all a favor if they actually explained how the points Steven Greer made in his class, such as the fact that “insult to Islam was punishable by death,” represent a “misinformed and bigoted view of Islam.” What exactly has Greer said that is false? According to this story, one student pointed out that Muslim leaders condemned the Charlie Hebdo jihad massacre. Of course neither the student nor Al Jazeera mention that hundreds of thousands of Muslims showed up in the wake of that massacre to protest not in favor of the freedom of expression, but against it.
#news #UK #Europe #immigration #islam
UK: Muslim students demand apology for prof insulting Islam by saying insults to Islam are punishable by death
 
Why Greenpeace is dropping huge boulders into the sea - BBC News https://www.bbc.com/news/av/science-environment-56201231

The waters are already protected, but since fishermen don't care Greenpeace is dropping boulders to stop the practice of bottom trawling.

Maybe find something else to eat. Just a thought.
Tags: #dandelíon #BBC #fish #fishing #overfishing #Greenpeace #UK #news

via dandelion* client (Source)
 
Some actual new work! Not a new location unfortunately, have to wait for Lockdown to end first.

Today the weather was actually really nice, and properly started to feel like spring.

Loads more photos from this can be found here, if you’re bored https://www.iancylkowski.com/blog/2021/2/21/095nr2ngc06nu8iiioombm99sibgqh 👍

#landscape #nature #travel #photography #photo #photographie #winter #spring #cumbria #uk #britain #england
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Bild/Foto
 
Taiwan is doing great re pandemic, economy, and tackling fake news. This opinion piece by Arwa Mahdawi is a good read!

Humour over rumour? The world can learn a lot from Taiwan’s approach to fake news


#taiwan #covid19 #uk #media
 

Alex Macheras auf Twitter: "UK Quarantine Reality👇🏽 Madrid to Heathrow flight Onboard: passengers from ‘red list’ countries, such as Brazil, and passengers from elsewhere They all mix: boarding, onboard, same lavatory, on arrival On arrival: Some escorted to quarantine, others walk free on to the tube." / Twitter


Ugh. #corona #UK
 
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