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Items tagged with: Biology

#Forest the size of France regrown #worldwide over 20 years, study finds | #Trees and forests | The Guardian


Nice to see a counterpoint to #Deforestation for a change.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/may/11/forest-size-of-france-regrown-worldwide

#Environment #Biodiversity #Ecology #Reforestation #Biology #Wildlife
 


Even though I'm not good at math, I find it very exciting to rediscover the same patterns and methods in art.
(Music, sound design, Soundeffects, Graphics, Postproduction, Visual Art & FX, Motiontracking or Compression)

Maybe I´m wrong but I think, things get really flashy in #nature (see this amazing video of #mushrooms) when cell chemistry follows the same rules.


Everything is waveform, is dynamic and when you see the beauty of the dynamic, you may notice the pattern match that I see in it.


Maybe you think I'm wrong and the three videos are not connected in any way.

Maybe the connection is not so easy to see and I can not explain it well enough.
But I think quantum physics unites these patterns and shows up in different orders of magnitude.

#Math #Science #Physic #AI #Biology
 
#biology #evolution #anthropology #humans #neanderthals #interbreeding #homosapienshybrids

48,000-Year-Old Fossils Hint at Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding

Several hominin teeth found the Paleolithic site of La Cotte de St Brelade in Jersey may belong to Neanderthal-Homo sapiens hybrids, according to new research led by the Natural History Museum, London.
 
#biology #evolution #anthropology #humans #neanderthals #interbreeding #homosapienshybrids

48,000-Year-Old Fossils Hint at Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding

Several hominin teeth found the Paleolithic site of La Cotte de St Brelade in Jersey may belong to Neanderthal-Homo sapiens hybrids, according to new research led by the Natural History Museum, London.
 

The Patent That Could Destroy Monsanto And Change The World | Eco Snippets

In 2006, a patent was granted to a man named Paul Stamets. Though Paul is the world’s leading mycologist, his patent has received very little attention and exposure. Why is that? Stated by executives in the pesticide industry, this patent represents “the most disruptive technology we have ever witnessed.” And when the executives say disruptive, they are referring to it being disruptive to the chemical pesticides industry.

What has Paul discovered? The mycologist has figured out how to use mother nature’s own creations to keep insects from destroying crops. It’s what is being called SMART pesticides. These pesticides provide safe & nearly permanent solution for controlling over 200,000 species of insects – and all thanks to the ‘magic’ of mushrooms.
http://www.ecosnippets.com/environmental/patent-that-could-destroy-monsanto/

#environment #environnement #montsano #IntellectualProperty #patent #mycology #fungus #fungi #biology #chemistry #pesiticides #crops #insects #pests #ChemicalIndustry #food #agriculture #patents
The Patent That Could Destroy Monsanto And Change The World…
 

The Patent That Could Destroy Monsanto And Change The World | Eco Snippets

In 2006, a patent was granted to a man named Paul Stamets. Though Paul is the world’s leading mycologist, his patent has received very little attention and exposure. Why is that? Stated by executives in the pesticide industry, this patent represents “the most disruptive technology we have ever witnessed.” And when the executives say disruptive, they are referring to it being disruptive to the chemical pesticides industry.

What has Paul discovered? The mycologist has figured out how to use mother nature’s own creations to keep insects from destroying crops. It’s what is being called SMART pesticides. These pesticides provide safe & nearly permanent solution for controlling over 200,000 species of insects – and all thanks to the ‘magic’ of mushrooms.
http://www.ecosnippets.com/environmental/patent-that-could-destroy-monsanto/

#environment #environnement #montsano #IntellectualProperty #patent #mycology #fungus #fungi #biology #chemistry #pesiticides #crops #insects #pests #ChemicalIndustry #food #agriculture #patents
The Patent That Could Destroy Monsanto And Change The World…
 
#biology #animals #dogs #dogdomestication

Sharing Leftover Meat Enabled Dog Domestication during Harsh Ice Age Winters: Study
Jan 13, 2021

New research led by the University of Helsinki suggests that dog domestication needs to be understood in terms of competition over resources in the particularly severe environment that prevailed in northern Eurasia during the latter part of the Last Ice Age (29,000 to 14,000 years ago).
 
#biology #animals #dogs #dogdomestication

Sharing Leftover Meat Enabled Dog Domestication during Harsh Ice Age Winters: Study
Jan 13, 2021

New research led by the University of Helsinki suggests that dog domestication needs to be understood in terms of competition over resources in the particularly severe environment that prevailed in northern Eurasia during the latter part of the Last Ice Age (29,000 to 14,000 years ago).
 
#biology #bees #BeeDistributions #biodiversity
Scientists Map Distribution of Bee Species Worldwide

Using a uniquely comprehensive checklist of bee distributions and over 5,800,000 public bee occurrence records, a team of researchers from China, the United States and Singapore has described global patterns of bee biodiversity. Their results show that there are more bee species in the northern hemisphere than the southern hemisphere and more in arid and temperate environments than in the tropics.
 
#biology #bees #BeeDistributions #biodiversity
Scientists Map Distribution of Bee Species Worldwide

Using a uniquely comprehensive checklist of bee distributions and over 5,800,000 public bee occurrence records, a team of researchers from China, the United States and Singapore has described global patterns of bee biodiversity. Their results show that there are more bee species in the northern hemisphere than the southern hemisphere and more in arid and temperate environments than in the tropics.
 

Research breakthrough solves 50-year-old nervous system mystery – novel medical countermeasures on the horizon - Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut - FOI


Some kind of weird enzyme. ChAT.

#science #biology
 

Cognition all the way down


Questions like these where the reason I studied mathematics and informatics, decades ago. I didn't have any opportunities to do more than to just read a tiny fraction of the literature in my free time, but I enjoy the fact that there is indeed some synergy between theoretical and practical scienes at work, here. Recommended reading.

#biology #science #behaviourism #informatics #evolution #philosophy
 

Cognition all the way down


Questions like these where the reason I studied mathematics and informatics, decades ago. I didn't have any opportunities to do more than to just read a tiny fraction of the literature in my free time, but I enjoy the fact that there is indeed some synergy between theoretical and practical scienes at work, here. Recommended reading.

#biology #science #behaviourism #informatics #evolution #philosophy
 
Bild/Foto
not a lichen, as i had thought, but more likely to be a fungus - Terana caerulea; celebrated as the 2009 Fungus of the Year by the German Mycological Society. The wood was from a greengage tree
"When activated by external treatments such as high temperature (42 °C (108 °F)), exposure to vapors of toxic solvents, or contact with a water-toluene mixture, T. caerulea produces an antibiotic named cortalcerone (2-hydroxy-6H-3-pyrone-2-carboxaldehyde hydrate), that inhibits the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes. The metabolic biosynthesis of this compound starting from the initial precursor glucose has also been studied"

#photo #mycology #fungus #fungi #funghi #blue #biology #chemistry #medicine #science #myphoto #mywork
 
Bild/Foto
not a lichen, as i had thought, but more likely to be a fungus - Terana caerulea; celebrated as the 2009 Fungus of the Year by the German Mycological Society. The wood was from a greengage tree
"When activated by external treatments such as high temperature (42 °C (108 °F)), exposure to vapors of toxic solvents, or contact with a water-toluene mixture, T. caerulea produces an antibiotic named cortalcerone (2-hydroxy-6H-3-pyrone-2-carboxaldehyde hydrate), that inhibits the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes. The metabolic biosynthesis of this compound starting from the initial precursor glucose has also been studied"

#photo #mycology #fungus #fungi #funghi #blue #biology #chemistry #medicine #science #myphoto #mywork
 
Team finds all-new species—on Twitter - Futurity

Funny name
Researchers have discovered a new species of fungus via Twitter. They call it Troglomyces twitteri.
#fungus #twitter #biology
Team finds all-new species—on Twitter
 
Bild/Foto

Reading the bread book while also rewatching avatar: the last airbender this weekend. the result: bread santa sounds a lot like iroh in my head

Pyotr Alexeyevich Kropotkin was a Russian activist, writer, revolutionary, scientist, economist, sociologist, historian, essayist, researcher, political scientist, biologist, geographer and philosopher who advocated anarcho-communism.
#avatar #anime #science #biology #anarchism #bread
 
Bild/Foto
#biology #bees #photoset
Pretty Bee Appreciation Post! photoset, click link!!!
e.g. Photo by dianneclarke
Male valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta:
https://onenicebugperday.tumblr.com/post/614500560054501376/i-was-asked-to-post-a-favorite-apid-today-and-i
 
Bild/Foto
#biology #bees #photoset
Pretty Bee Appreciation Post! photoset, click link!!!
e.g. Photo by dianneclarke
Male valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta:
https://onenicebugperday.tumblr.com/post/614500560054501376/i-was-asked-to-post-a-favorite-apid-today-and-i
 

Folding@home takes up the fight against COVID-19 / 2019-nCoV | Folding@home

We need your help! Folding@home is joining researchers around the world working to better understand the 2019 Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) to accelerate the open science effort to develop new life-saving therapies. By downloading Folding@Home, you can donate your unused computational resources to the Folding@home Consortium, where researchers working to advance our understanding of the structures of potential drug targets for 2019-nCoV that could aid in the design of new therapies. The data you help us generate will be quickly and openly disseminated as part of an open science collaboration of multiple laboratories around the world, giving researchers new tools that may unlock new opportunities for developing lifesaving drugs.
Click the FOLDING@HOME link at the top left of the page to get started.

#technology #tech #science #biology #medicine #health #coronavirus
 

Folding@home takes up the fight against COVID-19 / 2019-nCoV | Folding@home

We need your help! Folding@home is joining researchers around the world working to better understand the 2019 Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) to accelerate the open science effort to develop new life-saving therapies. By downloading Folding@Home, you can donate your unused computational resources to the Folding@home Consortium, where researchers working to advance our understanding of the structures of potential drug targets for 2019-nCoV that could aid in the design of new therapies. The data you help us generate will be quickly and openly disseminated as part of an open science collaboration of multiple laboratories around the world, giving researchers new tools that may unlock new opportunities for developing lifesaving drugs.
Click the FOLDING@HOME link at the top left of the page to get started.

#technology #tech #science #biology #medicine #health #coronavirus
 

Macrostylis metallicola – Tiefseeforschung rockt! – Meertext


Deep sea #metal! #biology
Macrostylis metallicola – Tiefseeforschung rockt!
 
On the ancient roots of roots.

"At 385 million years old, the ancient woodland predates the rise of seed-producing plants, a group that includes almost all living trees. The Paleozoic forest is also home to the remnants of intricate tree root systems that bear an uncanny resemblance to those still around today."

#Palaeontology #Fossils #Biology #Plants

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/385-million-year-old-fossils-reveal-worlds-oldest-forest-had-modern-tree-roots-180973810/
 
Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form

https://m.phys.org/news/2019-12-azteca-ant-colonies-leopards.html

#science
#biology
 
Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form

https://m.phys.org/news/2019-12-azteca-ant-colonies-leopards.html

#science
#biology
 

The Deep Sea


Oh this is nice. Make sure to get some information about these animals while scrolling down and going deeper, there are some really surprising facts one usually doesn't know.
https://neal.fun/deep-sea

#deepsea #biology
 

Robot vs. Superbug


#3dprinterhacks #3dprinter #biology #camera #chemistry #dbot #lab #microbiology #octoprint #opensource #picamera #raspberrypi #reprap #research #hackaday
posted by pod_feeder_v2
Robot vs. Superbug
 

Robot vs. Superbug


#3dprinterhacks #3dprinter #biology #camera #chemistry #dbot #lab #microbiology #octoprint #opensource #picamera #raspberrypi #reprap #research #hackaday
posted by pod_feeder_v2
Robot vs. Superbug
 
#hiking #hikingmanuelacasasoli #science #sciencemanuelacasasoli
When a leaf has almost recovered all the chlorophyll…
It is an astonishing example of sustainability!
 
#hiking #hikingmanuelacasasoli #science #sciencemanuelacasasoli
When a leaf has almost recovered all the chlorophyll…
It is an astonishing example of sustainability!
 
A fascinating look at Pterosaurs. Hard to imagine the strange anatomy of these reptiles (note: they are not dinosaurs) or the fact that they really could fly.
Pterosaurs were the first vertebrate creatures to evolve powered flight and conquer the air—long before birds took wing. They prevailed for more than 160 million years before vanishing along with the nonbird dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, around 66 million years ago. In that time, they evolved some of the most extreme anatomical adaptations of any animal, living or extinct. The smallest of these aerial predators was the size of a sparrow. The largest had a wingspan that rivaled that of an F-16 fighter jet. Many possessed heads larger than their bodies, making them, in essence, flying jaws of death. Pterosaurs patrolled every ocean and continent on Earth. No animal in the Mesozoic would have been safe from their gaze.

Unlike dinosaurs, which are survived today by birds, pterosaurs left behind no living descendants. As a result, all that paleontologists know about pterosaurs comes from the fossil record. And that record has been frustratingly fragmentary, leaving us with just a glimmer of their former glory and a host of questions about their bizarre anatomy and ill fate. Paleontologists have scratched their heads over these mysteries for decades. Now new fossil discoveries, combined with mathematical modeling methods in which anatomical structures are simplified just enough that equations of physical properties can be applied to get best estimates of strength, weight, speed, and so forth, are finally generating insights. And what scientists are finding is that pterosaurs were even more extraordinary than we ever imagined.
#Palaeontology #Reptiles #Pterosaurs #Evolution #Biology
 
A fascinating look at Pterosaurs. Hard to imagine the strange anatomy of these reptiles (note: they are not dinosaurs) or the fact that they really could fly.
Pterosaurs were the first vertebrate creatures to evolve powered flight and conquer the air—long before birds took wing. They prevailed for more than 160 million years before vanishing along with the nonbird dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, around 66 million years ago. In that time, they evolved some of the most extreme anatomical adaptations of any animal, living or extinct. The smallest of these aerial predators was the size of a sparrow. The largest had a wingspan that rivaled that of an F-16 fighter jet. Many possessed heads larger than their bodies, making them, in essence, flying jaws of death. Pterosaurs patrolled every ocean and continent on Earth. No animal in the Mesozoic would have been safe from their gaze.

Unlike dinosaurs, which are survived today by birds, pterosaurs left behind no living descendants. As a result, all that paleontologists know about pterosaurs comes from the fossil record. And that record has been frustratingly fragmentary, leaving us with just a glimmer of their former glory and a host of questions about their bizarre anatomy and ill fate. Paleontologists have scratched their heads over these mysteries for decades. Now new fossil discoveries, combined with mathematical modeling methods in which anatomical structures are simplified just enough that equations of physical properties can be applied to get best estimates of strength, weight, speed, and so forth, are finally generating insights. And what scientists are finding is that pterosaurs were even more extraordinary than we ever imagined.
#Palaeontology #Reptiles #Pterosaurs #Evolution #Biology
 

The Octopus: An Alien Among Us | Literary Hub


#science #biology

Octopuses are the superstars of the invertebrates because of their astonishing intelligence. They’re considered mollusks, like clams or snails. Mollusks probably first appeared about 550 MYA and remained relatively simple, at least in the organization of their nervous systems, for hundreds of millions of years. One branch, the cephalopods, eventually evolved a complex brain and sophisticated behavior and may have reached something close to the modern form of an octopus around 300 MYA.

Octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish are true aliens with respect to us. No other intelligent animal is as far from us on the tree of life. They show us that big-brained smartness is not a one-off event, because it evolved independently at least twice—first among the vertebrates and then again among the invertebrates.
The Octopus: An Alien Among Us
 

The Octopus: An Alien Among Us | Literary Hub


#science #biology

Octopuses are the superstars of the invertebrates because of their astonishing intelligence. They’re considered mollusks, like clams or snails. Mollusks probably first appeared about 550 MYA and remained relatively simple, at least in the organization of their nervous systems, for hundreds of millions of years. One branch, the cephalopods, eventually evolved a complex brain and sophisticated behavior and may have reached something close to the modern form of an octopus around 300 MYA.

Octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish are true aliens with respect to us. No other intelligent animal is as far from us on the tree of life. They show us that big-brained smartness is not a one-off event, because it evolved independently at least twice—first among the vertebrates and then again among the invertebrates.
The Octopus: An Alien Among Us
 
The amazing power of gut bacteria. Here's an article about one that can metabolize sugars from food into alcohol.
A man in China who, after eating high-carbohydrate or sugary meals, became so intoxicated that he blacked out, has led researchers to discover strains of bacteria in the human gut that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.
[...]
Doctors previously had diagnosed the man’s intoxication problem as autobrewery syndrome, a rarely reported condition in which people become drunk from starchy or sugary foods. It is thought to be caused by gut fermentation, aided by an abundance of yeast. But antifungal treatment had no effect on the man. Liver biopsies showed he had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. He was moved to the intensive care unit and closely observed. Doctors noted that after he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” Yuan says.

Because some other microbes can metabolize sugars into alcohol, Yuan and colleagues analyzed 14 of the man’s stool samples taken at different times for species-specific bacterial DNA fragments. They found that when he was most intoxicated, 18.8% of the bacteria in a sample were K. pneumoniae, a 900-fold increase over normal. When they put these bacteria in a medium of yeast and sugar, they could isolate strains of the bacterium that produced high, medium, or low levels of alcohol.
[...]
Yuan and colleagues report that the initial patient they studied recovered from his bacteria-driven autobrewery syndrome after he began to take antibiotics and changed his diet. His NASH has abated, too. Her team is now planning to study the gut microbes of a large group of people, including children, over time. “We want to investigate why some people have high-alcohol-producing strains of K. pneumoniae in their gut while others don’t,” she says.

Diehl cautions that the new study speaks only to a subset of NAFLD patients. But she predicts “this will work will attract a lot of attention.”
#Science #Biology #Bacteria #Microbiomes
 
The amazing power of gut bacteria. Here's an article about one that can metabolize sugars from food into alcohol.
A man in China who, after eating high-carbohydrate or sugary meals, became so intoxicated that he blacked out, has led researchers to discover strains of bacteria in the human gut that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.
[...]
Doctors previously had diagnosed the man’s intoxication problem as autobrewery syndrome, a rarely reported condition in which people become drunk from starchy or sugary foods. It is thought to be caused by gut fermentation, aided by an abundance of yeast. But antifungal treatment had no effect on the man. Liver biopsies showed he had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. He was moved to the intensive care unit and closely observed. Doctors noted that after he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” Yuan says.

Because some other microbes can metabolize sugars into alcohol, Yuan and colleagues analyzed 14 of the man’s stool samples taken at different times for species-specific bacterial DNA fragments. They found that when he was most intoxicated, 18.8% of the bacteria in a sample were K. pneumoniae, a 900-fold increase over normal. When they put these bacteria in a medium of yeast and sugar, they could isolate strains of the bacterium that produced high, medium, or low levels of alcohol.
[...]
Yuan and colleagues report that the initial patient they studied recovered from his bacteria-driven autobrewery syndrome after he began to take antibiotics and changed his diet. His NASH has abated, too. Her team is now planning to study the gut microbes of a large group of people, including children, over time. “We want to investigate why some people have high-alcohol-producing strains of K. pneumoniae in their gut while others don’t,” she says.

Diehl cautions that the new study speaks only to a subset of NAFLD patients. But she predicts “this will work will attract a lot of attention.”
#Science #Biology #Bacteria #Microbiomes
 
The amazing power of gut bacteria. Here's an article about one that can metabolize sugars from food into alcohol.
A man in China who, after eating high-carbohydrate or sugary meals, became so intoxicated that he blacked out, has led researchers to discover strains of bacteria in the human gut that could be an important driver of the world’s most common liver disease.
[...]
Doctors previously had diagnosed the man’s intoxication problem as autobrewery syndrome, a rarely reported condition in which people become drunk from starchy or sugary foods. It is thought to be caused by gut fermentation, aided by an abundance of yeast. But antifungal treatment had no effect on the man. Liver biopsies showed he had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD. He was moved to the intensive care unit and closely observed. Doctors noted that after he ate a meal high in sugar, his blood alcohol level rose to as high as 400 milligrams per deciliter. “That’s equivalent to 15 shots of 40% [80-proof] whisky,” Yuan says.

Because some other microbes can metabolize sugars into alcohol, Yuan and colleagues analyzed 14 of the man’s stool samples taken at different times for species-specific bacterial DNA fragments. They found that when he was most intoxicated, 18.8% of the bacteria in a sample were K. pneumoniae, a 900-fold increase over normal. When they put these bacteria in a medium of yeast and sugar, they could isolate strains of the bacterium that produced high, medium, or low levels of alcohol.
[...]
Yuan and colleagues report that the initial patient they studied recovered from his bacteria-driven autobrewery syndrome after he began to take antibiotics and changed his diet. His NASH has abated, too. Her team is now planning to study the gut microbes of a large group of people, including children, over time. “We want to investigate why some people have high-alcohol-producing strains of K. pneumoniae in their gut while others don’t,” she says.

Diehl cautions that the new study speaks only to a subset of NAFLD patients. But she predicts “this will work will attract a lot of attention.”
#Science #Biology #Bacteria #Microbiomes
 
#biology #horses #hair #horsestyleHair
These horses are having an excellent hair day
Photographer Wiebke Haas celebrates equine beauty with her photo series 'Horsestyle.'
 
#biology #horses #hair #horsestyleHair
These horses are having an excellent hair day
Photographer Wiebke Haas celebrates equine beauty with her photo series 'Horsestyle.'
 
Huh. So Antarctica [does have an insect](https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/09/science/antarctica-insects-midge-cold.html]. Cool.
There are between five million and six million insect species worldwide, and scientists have described about one million of them. Of these, only one, the Antarctic midge, is able to survive at the bottom of the planet. Purplish, wriggly and the size of a pinkie fingernail clipping, Antarctic midge larvae live for nearly two years underground, often near penguin and seal excrement. They spend over half of their lives, about eight months of the year, frozen.

Nicholas Teets, who leads the Insect Stress Biology Lab at the University of Kentucky, published an article last month in the Journal of Experimental Biology that reveals how Antarctic midge larvae are able to survive such extremes. By better understanding the processes at work, scientists hope that the Antarctic midges’ survival strategies — including dehydration and freezing — might have applications for the preservation of human tissues, such as organs harvested for transplants.
#Nature #Biology #Insects #Environment #Antarctica
 
Huh. So Antarctica [does have an insect](https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/09/science/antarctica-insects-midge-cold.html]. Cool.
There are between five million and six million insect species worldwide, and scientists have described about one million of them. Of these, only one, the Antarctic midge, is able to survive at the bottom of the planet. Purplish, wriggly and the size of a pinkie fingernail clipping, Antarctic midge larvae live for nearly two years underground, often near penguin and seal excrement. They spend over half of their lives, about eight months of the year, frozen.

Nicholas Teets, who leads the Insect Stress Biology Lab at the University of Kentucky, published an article last month in the Journal of Experimental Biology that reveals how Antarctic midge larvae are able to survive such extremes. By better understanding the processes at work, scientists hope that the Antarctic midges’ survival strategies — including dehydration and freezing — might have applications for the preservation of human tissues, such as organs harvested for transplants.
#Nature #Biology #Insects #Environment #Antarctica
 
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