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Selfless CC0 public domain challenge -- let's try this :)


Bild/Foto

In today's highly competitive and self-centered world of terms, conditions, laws and restrictions, let's try to be different at least for a little while. For fun, new experience and the benefit of us all.

What is this?


This is a challenge that states this:

During the next month, create an original work and share it under Creative Common Zero (CC0), public domain dedication license.

This is a challenge to create something, even very small, completely with the goal to help everyone, without any self interest and limiting conditions. This doesn't mean you won't get any reward for your work -- people may choose to reward you, you will get a good feeling -- but this isn't the goal, the motivation, nor an obstacle to your creativity.

Please feel free to copy-paste or reshare this on other social media!

How?

  • Create something original (see the note below) of any nature, quality and scale. Bonus points for providing source files/code or using free as in freedom software for this! The work can be:
    • a picture,
    • photo,
    • video,
    • piece of music,
    • sound recording,
    • computer program,
    • 3D model,
    • literary work
    • or anything similar :)
  • Share it in an appropriate place on the Internet under the CC0 waiver (please do not use other waivers or licenses, they may be ineffective or incompatible). This means you'll give up your copyright and allow anyone to use your work in any way without any conditions, putting your work into the public domain. You can share your work e.g. at (don't forget to select CC0 during the upload!):
    • Wikimedia Commons, likely the biggest sharing place of free cultural works,
    • OpenGameArt, game related art,
    • Freesound, sound samples,
    • Internet Archive,
    • Blendswap, 3D models,
    • Gitlab, computer code,
    • Flickr and other sites supporting CC0 licensing,
    • even places like Youtube can be used, but some of them may complicate sharing e.g. by prohibiting downloading in their terms and conditions, so try to prefer the above :)
    • or other fitting place.
  • You're now encouraged to let others know and share your work on social media using the #cc0challenge hashtag :)

IMPORTANT NOTE


The work you create has to be original and NOT contain any material owned by someone else, so you e.g. CANNOT create a Harry Potter picture or a cover of a Beatles song, but you MAY use a work that is already in the public domain, e.g. a Mozart's composition or something someone else shared on the Internet under CC0.

The copyright rules are complex and often even determining if something is owned by someone is very difficult. If unsure about whether you can use something, rather go with your own work, or ask more experienced people.

FAQ

Why?


Free culture is already a niché topic that needs more supporters, and even within this community I feel like CC0 and public domain often gets lost in the shadow of attribution and sharealike licensing. I have personally tried all kinds of free sharing and eventually arrived at using CC0 exclusively. I don't want to force it, but want people to try it and decide for themselves what limitations they feel are really necessary to impose on their works. Licenses such as CC-BY-SA are widely used -- I simply want you to try CC0 too, and then decide what worked the best. Besides this, with this challenge we can also:
  • do something good,
  • conduct a personal experiment: try CC0 and see what it results in -- perhaps it will become a hobby, perhaps you'll find you'll really rather stick with CC-BY-SA etc.,
  • find a motivation to simply create something,
  • in the process promote public domain and related topics, such as free culture.

How exactly do I share my work under CC0?


This is easy, you must only clearly state that your work is released under CC0 or attach the waiver to the work somehow -- simply let others know you use this waiver for this work. This can be as easy as stating "I release this work under CC0." in the description of your work. However, it is best if you:
  • Provide the licensing information as clearly as possible, i.e. attach also a link to the waiver text (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) and state its full name and version (CC0 1.0 Universal).
  • Attach full text of the waiver to the work if possible (e.g. put it in the archive you distribute the work in).
  • Provide and ideally archive the proof that you've really used this license. This is often solved simply by uploading the work to a well established site, such as Wikimedia Commons, and selecting CC0 as a license.
Don't forget that in order for your work to be put in the public domain it mustn't contain any material owned by someone else!

What do I get from this?


You'll get exactly as much as you give others, since the work you create can be used by anyone, including yourself. And, of course, you'll also get a good feeling of a selfless act and a new experience :)

Even CC0 can be used for self interest goals, but the point of this challenge is to not focus on self interest and see what it feels like and what it results in to simply share something with the sole intent to help others.

Shouldn't I at least require credit or "personal use only" for my work?


There exist licenses for this and you can do this, but not in this challenge. I am not implying it is bad, just that it is very often unnecessary, and would like you to simply reevaluate when it is necessary to impose these condition. The point of this experiment is to try to impose NO restrictions at all and see what happens.

Personally I have found that I mostly get credit even if I don't require it -- people simply do it even if no one forces them to. With CC0 you can still say you'll appreciate credit, you just give up the right to sue someone for not crediting you.

Personal/non-commercial licenses exist too but in the end they impose a very big restriction (since commercial/personal use are very vaguely defined) and such works aren't even considered free cultural works. If you impose this restriction, people will never know exactly what they can do and may easily get discouraged to use your work.

But can't my work be abused?


Firstly this depends on what you mean by abuse, but indeed, other people may in theory make money from your work or use it in a way you wouldn't support. This however doesn't always have to be wrong and may in fact lead to very good things, just as unrestricted sharing of knowledge in science leads to many good things. Indeed it can also lead to things you will perceive as wrong.

But you can only find out by actually trying it. Through this challenge you can make a small experiment in which you can see what this trust, and power, you give others can lead to. You give others the power, and also the responsibility over something you create. From the result you can then decide whether it was a good decision and whether you want to continue in this type of sharing or not in the future.

Don't be afraid, this is already working -- many people are already sharing millions of works under CC0, including very great ones, such as these:

Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
This post by drummyfish is shared under CC0 1.0, public domain.

#cc0 #challenge #cc0challenge #freeculture #sharing #experiment
 

Selfless CC0 public domain challenge -- let's try this :)


Bild/Foto

In today's highly competitive and self-centered world of terms, conditions, laws and restrictions, let's try to be different at least for a little while. For fun, new experience and the benefit of us all.

What is this?


This is a challenge that states this:

During the next month, create an original work and share it under Creative Common Zero (CC0), public domain dedication license.

This is a challenge to create something, even very small, completely with the goal to help everyone, without any self interest and limiting conditions. This doesn't mean you won't get any reward for your work -- people may choose to reward you, you will get a good feeling -- but this isn't the goal, the motivation, nor an obstacle to your creativity.

Please feel free to copy-paste or reshare this on other social media!

How?

  • Create something original (see the note below) of any nature, quality and scale. Bonus points for providing source files/code or using free as in freedom software for this! The work can be:
    • a picture,
    • photo,
    • video,
    • piece of music,
    • sound recording,
    • computer program,
    • 3D model,
    • literary work
    • or anything similar :)
  • Share it in an appropriate place on the Internet under the CC0 waiver (please do not use other waivers or licenses, they may be ineffective or incompatible). This means you'll give up your copyright and allow anyone to use your work in any way without any conditions, putting your work into the public domain. You can share your work e.g. at (don't forget to select CC0 during the upload!):
    • Wikimedia Commons, likely the biggest sharing place of free cultural works,
    • OpenGameArt, game related art,
    • Freesound, sound samples,
    • Internet Archive,
    • Blendswap, 3D models,
    • Gitlab, computer code,
    • Flickr and other sites supporting CC0 licensing,
    • even places like Youtube can be used, but some of them may complicate sharing e.g. by prohibiting downloading in their terms and conditions, so try to prefer the above :)
    • or other fitting place.
  • You're now encouraged to let others know and share your work on social media using the #cc0challenge hashtag :)

IMPORTANT NOTE


The work you create has to be original and NOT contain any material owned by someone else, so you e.g. CANNOT create a Harry Potter picture or a cover of a Beatles song, but you MAY use a work that is already in the public domain, e.g. a Mozart's composition or something someone else shared on the Internet under CC0.

The copyright rules are complex and often even determining if something is owned by someone is very difficult. If unsure about whether you can use something, rather go with your own work, or ask more experienced people.

FAQ

Why?


Free culture is already a niché topic that needs more supporters, and even within this community I feel like CC0 and public domain often gets lost in the shadow of attribution and sharealike licensing. I have personally tried all kinds of free sharing and eventually arrived at using CC0 exclusively. I don't want to force it, but want people to try it and decide for themselves what limitations they feel are really necessary to impose on their works. Licenses such as CC-BY-SA are widely used -- I simply want you to try CC0 too, and then decide what worked the best. Besides this, with this challenge we can also:
  • do something good,
  • conduct a personal experiment: try CC0 and see what it results in -- perhaps it will become a hobby, perhaps you'll find you'll really rather stick with CC-BY-SA etc.,
  • find a motivation to simply create something,
  • in the process promote public domain and related topics, such as free culture.

How exactly do I share my work under CC0?


This is easy, you must only clearly state that your work is released under CC0 or attach the waiver to the work somehow -- simply let others know you use this waiver for this work. This can be as easy as stating "I release this work under CC0." in the description of your work. However, it is best if you:
  • Provide the licensing information as clearly as possible, i.e. attach also a link to the waiver text (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) and state its full name and version (CC0 1.0 Universal).
  • Attach full text of the waiver to the work if possible (e.g. put it in the archive you distribute the work in).
  • Provide and ideally archive the proof that you've really used this license. This is often solved simply by uploading the work to a well established site, such as Wikimedia Commons, and selecting CC0 as a license.
Don't forget that in order for your work to be put in the public domain it mustn't contain any material owned by someone else!

What do I get from this?


You'll get exactly as much as you give others, since the work you create can be used by anyone, including yourself. And, of course, you'll also get a good feeling of a selfless act and a new experience :)

Even CC0 can be used for self interest goals, but the point of this challenge is to not focus on self interest and see what it feels like and what it results in to simply share something with the sole intent to help others.

Shouldn't I at least require credit or "personal use only" for my work?


There exist licenses for this and you can do this, but not in this challenge. I am not implying it is bad, just that it is very often unnecessary, and would like you to simply reevaluate when it is necessary to impose these condition. The point of this experiment is to try to impose NO restrictions at all and see what happens.

Personally I have found that I mostly get credit even if I don't require it -- people simply do it even if no one forces them to. With CC0 you can still say you'll appreciate credit, you just give up the right to sue someone for not crediting you.

Personal/non-commercial licenses exist too but in the end they impose a very big restriction (since commercial/personal use are very vaguely defined) and such works aren't even considered free cultural works. If you impose this restriction, people will never know exactly what they can do and may easily get discouraged to use your work.

But can't my work be abused?


Firstly this depends on what you mean by abuse, but indeed, other people may in theory make money from your work or use it in a way you wouldn't support. This however doesn't always have to be wrong and may in fact lead to very good things, just as unrestricted sharing of knowledge in science leads to many good things. Indeed it can also lead to things you will perceive as wrong.

But you can only find out by actually trying it. Through this challenge you can make a small experiment in which you can see what this trust, and power, you give others can lead to. You give others the power, and also the responsibility over something you create. From the result you can then decide whether it was a good decision and whether you want to continue in this type of sharing or not in the future.

Don't be afraid, this is already working -- many people are already sharing millions of works under CC0, including very great ones, such as these:

Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
This post by drummyfish is shared under CC0 1.0, public domain.

#cc0 #challenge #cc0challenge #freeculture #sharing #experiment
 

Selfless CC0 public domain challenge -- let's try this :)


Bild/Foto

In today's highly competitive and self-centered world of terms, conditions, laws and restrictions, let's try to be different at least for a little while. For fun, new experience and the benefit of us all.

What is this?


This is a challenge that states this:

During the next month, create an original work and share it under Creative Common Zero (CC0), public domain dedication license.

This is a challenge to create something, even very small, completely with the goal to help everyone, without any self interest and limiting conditions. This doesn't mean you won't get any reward for your work -- people may choose to reward you, you will get a good feeling -- but this isn't the goal, the motivation, nor an obstacle to your creativity.

Please feel free to copy-paste or reshare this on other social media!

How?

  • Create something original (see the note below) of any nature, quality and scale. Bonus points for providing source files/code or using free as in freedom software for this! The work can be:
    • a picture,
    • photo,
    • video,
    • piece of music,
    • sound recording,
    • computer program,
    • 3D model,
    • literary work
    • or anything similar :)
  • Share it in an appropriate place on the Internet under the CC0 waiver (please do not use other waivers or licenses, they may be ineffective or incompatible). This means you'll give up your copyright and allow anyone to use your work in any way without any conditions, putting your work into the public domain. You can share your work e.g. at (don't forget to select CC0 during the upload!):
    • Wikimedia Commons, likely the biggest sharing place of free cultural works,
    • OpenGameArt, game related art,
    • Freesound, sound samples,
    • Internet Archive,
    • Blendswap, 3D models,
    • Gitlab, computer code,
    • Flickr and other sites supporting CC0 licensing,
    • even places like Youtube can be used, but some of them may complicate sharing e.g. by prohibiting downloading in their terms and conditions, so try to prefer the above :)
    • or other fitting place.
  • You're now encouraged to let others know and share your work on social media using the #cc0challenge hashtag :)

IMPORTANT NOTE


The work you create has to be original and NOT contain any material owned by someone else, so you e.g. CANNOT create a Harry Potter picture or a cover of a Beatles song, but you MAY use a work that is already in the public domain, e.g. a Mozart's composition or something someone else shared on the Internet under CC0.

The copyright rules are complex and often even determining if something is owned by someone is very difficult. If unsure about whether you can use something, rather go with your own work, or ask more experienced people.

FAQ

Why?


Free culture is already a niché topic that needs more supporters, and even within this community I feel like CC0 and public domain often gets lost in the shadow of attribution and sharealike licensing. I have personally tried all kinds of free sharing and eventually arrived at using CC0 exclusively. I don't want to force it, but want people to try it and decide for themselves what limitations they feel are really necessary to impose on their works. Licenses such as CC-BY-SA are widely used -- I simply want you to try CC0 too, and then decide what worked the best. Besides this, with this challenge we can also:
  • do something good,
  • conduct a personal experiment: try CC0 and see what it results in -- perhaps it will become a hobby, perhaps you'll find you'll really rather stick with CC-BY-SA etc.,
  • find a motivation to simply create something,
  • in the process promote public domain and related topics, such as free culture.

How exactly do I share my work under CC0?


This is easy, you must only clearly state that your work is released under CC0 or attach the waiver to the work somehow -- simply let others know you use this waiver for this work. This can be as easy as stating "I release this work under CC0." in the description of your work. However, it is best if you:
  • Provide the licensing information as clearly as possible, i.e. attach also a link to the waiver text (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) and state its full name and version (CC0 1.0 Universal).
  • Attach full text of the waiver to the work if possible (e.g. put it in the archive you distribute the work in).
  • Provide and ideally archive the proof that you've really used this license. This is often solved simply by uploading the work to a well established site, such as Wikimedia Commons, and selecting CC0 as a license.
Don't forget that in order for your work to be put in the public domain it mustn't contain any material owned by someone else!

What do I get from this?


You'll get exactly as much as you give others, since the work you create can be used by anyone, including yourself. And, of course, you'll also get a good feeling of a selfless act and a new experience :)

Even CC0 can be used for self interest goals, but the point of this challenge is to not focus on self interest and see what it feels like and what it results in to simply share something with the sole intent to help others.

Shouldn't I at least require credit or "personal use only" for my work?


There exist licenses for this and you can do this, but not in this challenge. I am not implying it is bad, just that it is very often unnecessary, and would like you to simply reevaluate when it is necessary to impose these condition. The point of this experiment is to try to impose NO restrictions at all and see what happens.

Personally I have found that I mostly get credit even if I don't require it -- people simply do it even if no one forces them to. With CC0 you can still say you'll appreciate credit, you just give up the right to sue someone for not crediting you.

Personal/non-commercial licenses exist too but in the end they impose a very big restriction (since commercial/personal use are very vaguely defined) and such works aren't even considered free cultural works. If you impose this restriction, people will never know exactly what they can do and may easily get discouraged to use your work.

But can't my work be abused?


Firstly this depends on what you mean by abuse, but indeed, other people may in theory make money from your work or use it in a way you wouldn't support. This however doesn't always have to be wrong and may in fact lead to very good things, just as unrestricted sharing of knowledge in science leads to many good things. Indeed it can also lead to things you will perceive as wrong.

But you can only find out by actually trying it. Through this challenge you can make a small experiment in which you can see what this trust, and power, you give others can lead to. You give others the power, and also the responsibility over something you create. From the result you can then decide whether it was a good decision and whether you want to continue in this type of sharing or not in the future.

Don't be afraid, this is already working -- many people are already sharing millions of works under CC0, including very great ones, such as these:

Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
Bild/Foto
This post by drummyfish is shared under CC0 1.0, public domain.

#cc0 #challenge #cc0challenge #freeculture #sharing #experiment
 
#Retro #Recipes completed another #challenge, and what an interesting one. Leading back to a #synth #song from 30 years ago.. A nice story, imho. ;)


#retrogaming #retrocomputing #80smusic #amiga #demos #music #sample #randomshit
 
Die #härteste #challenge in #2020 ... irgendetwas aktuelles von #Trump zu sehen, ohne heftiges #fazialpalmieren.

The #hardest #challenge in #2020, seeing anything recent from #trump without intensive #facepalming.
 
#Pippikakka #Challenge:

Versucht mal im #Alltag statt
#Scheisse -> Pippikakka
#Arschloch -> Pippikakkakakker
#Scheissen -> Pippikakka machen

zu sagen, 1 Woche lang und berichtet dann von euren Erlebnissen. Bonuspunkt wer dabei die ganze Woche lang nicht lacht.
 

Ei-Scheiben / Alle Rechte vorbehalten © AndiDroid ;-)


Ei-Scheiben / Foto unverändert - Alle Rechte vorbehalten © AndiDroid 😉
Mein Fotobeitrag zum Thema des Monats April: Easter Or Egg / Ostern oder Ei
#TTM #TTM0419 #Wettbewerb #challenge #myphoto #mywork #AndiDroid #Foto #photo #Kamera #camera #Fotografie #photography #Ei #gplusrefugee
Bild/Foto
 
My contribution to #diaspoRAW-2019-02






Developed with Capture One and finished with Affinity Photo.
I went for a natural look, reduced some highlights brought up some shadows and added a bit of luminosity. Some grass was added in the bottom right corner and I cropped a bit in to bring the building a little closer to the eye of the beholder.





#diaspoRAW #photography #Fotografie #Foto #photo #Wettbewerb #challenge
 
Theme Of The Month
Starts:  Friday March 01, 2019 @ 12:00 AM
Finishes:  Sunday March 31, 2019 @ 12:00 AM
Hello photographers of the Fediverse

It's time for another "Theme Of The Month" challenge. You may join in at any time. All you have to do is take a picture that matches the theme of the month and tag it with the corresponding hashtags.

To give you more freedom of choice, I'll make two suggestions

Theme Of The Month #TTM March is: "Colorful" or "Edible"
Hashtag is: #TTM0319

Image/Photo
Photo Credit: it's me neosiam (CC0) @Pexels.com

Please don't forget to use the #TTM and #TTM0319 hashtags in your post so I, and everyone else, can find your theme of the month contributions easily and like / comment them

#art #challenge #photography #photo #camera #Kunst #Wettbewerb #Fotografie #Foto #Kamera
 

Meine #Linux Testwoche - Tag 1: Welche Programme brauch ich denn eigentlich?


Nachdem nun endlich #LinuxMint installiert war und lief, kam als allererstes die Frage auf welche #Software ich gerne haben möchte?
Ich stellte mit wenig Überraschung fest, was mich überhaupt zum Umzug bewog: die meisten Anwendungen gibt es für #Linux.
#Firefox, #Vivaldi, #Audacity, #Steam, #Virtualbox, #Nextcloud, #Teamspeak, #Discord, #Telegram, #VLC, #Clementine, #Calibre, #Cryptomator, #TorBrowser und #qtorrent - alles #Programme die teilweise aus dem #Linux-Kosmos kommen doch auf beiden Welten tolle Dienste verrichten.

Die beiden einzigen die ich auf Anhieb vermisse: #Outlook und #Evernote

So ungern ich es zugebe, ich liebe #Outlook in der 2016er Version. Die Übersicht der #Einstellungen, die Einstellungsmöglichkeiten und das generelle Look and Feel sind nicht nur modern und aufgeräumt, sondern auch die automatisch erstellten Archive die in meine Nextcloud geschoben werden, sorgen mit den festgelegten Regeln für eine stets übersichtliche Mail-Struktur und ein freies Postfach bei meinem Anbieter. Zu erwähnen sei, dass ich #Posteo benutze, das Postfach ist 2GB groß.

#Thunderbird hingegen wirkt im Vergleich dazu, zumindest rein optisch, überholt. Vielleicht eine Einstellungssache doch wozu brauche ich die letzten 50 Mails in meinem Posteingang, dicht an dicht gedrängt? Leider haben die Einstellungen der Anzeige zur Erhöhung der Schriftgröße nichts gebracht. Kümmere ich mich jedoch später drum. Mein Adressbuch habe ich bisher nicht eingebunden, sowie meinen Kalender von posteo, sollte jedoch mit #CardDav bzw. #CalDav kein Thema sein. Mach ich wenn ich es brauche. Die Filter sind eher schwierig. Jahrelange #Outlook Nutzung brachte gefühlt 50 Regeln mit dementsprechenden Ausnahmen zustande, was bei Ankunft einer Mail wie in welchen Ordner mit welchem Status geschoben wird. Da ich nebenbei einen kleinen #eBay Shop betreibe, kann da das tägliche aufkommen etwas explodieren. Zurzeit reicht es jedoch noch alles per Hand zu sortieren. Am Wochenende geh ich die Sache an.

#Evernote ist da das größere Problem. Seit 2011 nutze ich den Dienst, seit 3 Jahren als Premium Nutzer. Die Möglichkeiten sich dort zu organisieren und zu sortieren sind genial und das Windows Programm sehr mächtig. Leider fand ich keinen Client auf Anhieb, der meine wichtigste Funktion unterstützt: das Suchen und Setzen von Schlagwörtern. Erstmal muss ich auf die Weboberfläche ausweichen, vielleicht hat jemand auch einen Tip wie ich das Thema aus dem Weg schaffen kann.

Die Browser die ich rief

Browser habe ich stets immer 3 auf meinem System: #Torbrowser für Recherchen, #Firefox für alles alltägliche wie #eBay, #Diaspora, #Mastodon und #Banking. Ach so und #PornHub :D. #Vivaldi nur für #Youtube und #Twitch (jetzt auch #Evernote). Dank 16GB Ram laufe ich derzeit nicht in die kritische Zone, wenn alle drei mal gleichzeitig offen sind. Firefox lud auch nachdem ich mich im Sync anmeldete alle Favoriten, Add-Ons und Einstellungen nach. Leider muss ich no-Script neu trainieren. Vielleicht auch nicht die schlechteste Idee, den mal wieder auf 0 zu setzen. Ob alle meine Einstellungen aus about:config übernommen wurden konnte ich auf den ersten Blick nicht feststellen.

Da Vivaldi nur für die zwei Seiten Twitch und Youtube fungieren soll, läuft da nur ein einziges Add-On: #ublockOrigin. Bei Firefox sind es da eins zwei mehr. Neben bereits erwähntem #No-Script, laufen auch noch #uBlock, #SmartReferer, #SkipRedirect, #NeatURL, #CookieAutodelete, #Decentraleyes und #httpseverywhere. Damit komme ich zwar nie wieder auf irgendeine deutsche Tageszeitung doch wozu gibt es Tagesschau hihi.

Spiel mit mir

Im August las ich davon, dass #Steam jetzt aufgerüstet hat, was den Linux #Support von Spielen angeht. Das noch im Hinterkopf liegend, las ich den Artikel auf #heise dazu durch. Tatsächlich schien es möglich zu sein mit #Proton.
Gelesen, getan, Beta installiert und ein Spiel heruntergeladen, dass ich schon länger auf meiner Liste stehen hab. Rise of the Tomb Raider. Mit meiner #GTX1060 und den aus der Treiberverwaltung installiertem Treiber gewillt es auszuprobieren, stellte ich zu spät fest, dass es ja nativ auf Linux laufen soll. Upsi, naja tut dem kein Ablass ich teste es dennoch.
Den Client gestartet. Linux Version nicht unterstützt, ok, Grafikkarte nicht unterstützt, was? Ok. Treiberversion veraltet, wie denn bei einer nicht unterstützten Grafikkarte? Wie dem auch sei, 3 Fehlermeldungen bevor es losgehen kann waren nicht angedacht.
#Challenge accepted, alles auf ultra geschalten und #VSYNC an läuft im Schnitt mit 65fps. Arschlecken nicht unterstützt.
Um dieses #Proton jetzt zu testen hängt aktuell in der Warteschleife #Batman Arkham City. Ich bin gespannt.

Schade finde ich es irgendwie, das #GOG Galaxy noch nicht auf Linux verfügbar ist. Das wäre noch der nächste Schritt.

Das war es für heute, morgen gehe ich mal auf meine Hardware etwas mehr ein, und warum ich #LibreOffice nicht mag.
 
Hello photographers of the Fediverse

It's time for another "Theme Of The Month" challenge. You may join in at any time. All you have to do is take a picture that matches the theme of the month and tag it with the corresponding hashtags - Oh and please share :-)

To give you more freedom of choice, I'll make two suggestions

> Theme Of The Month #TTM March is: "Colorful" or "Edible"
> Hashtag is: #TTM0319





Photo Credit: it's me neosiam (CC0) @Pexels.com

Please don't forget to use the #TTM and #TTM0319 hashtags in your post so I, and everyone else, can find your theme of the month contributions easily and like / comment them

#art #challenge #mywork #photography #photo #camera #Kunst #Wettbewerb #Fotografie #Foto #Kamera
 
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